meningococcal meningitis


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me·nin·go·coc·cal men·in·gi·tis

an acute infectious disease of children and young adults, caused by Neisseria meningitidis and characterized by fever, headache, photophobia, vomiting, nuchal rigidity, seizures, coma, and a purpuric eruption. Even in the absence of meningitis, meningococcemia can induce toxic phenomena such as vasculitis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, shock, and Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome due to adrenal hemorrhage; late complications include paralysis, mental retardation, and gangrene of the extremities.

meningococcal meningitis

[mining′gōkok′əl]
bacterial meningitis caused by infection with Neisseria meningitidis, an acute infectious disease with seropurulent meningeal inflammation. It usually appears in epidemics, and symptoms are those of acute cerebral and spinal meningitis, usually with an eruption of cutaneous erythematous, herpetic, or hemorrhagic spots. The fulminating or malignant form accompanied with hemorrhagic apoplexy of adrenal glands is known as Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome. Also called cerebrospinal fever, epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis.

meningococcal meningitis

Meningeal infection by Neisseria meningitidis, primarily of children, typically of rapid onset after an upper respiratory tract infection (URI).
 
Epidemiology
More common in winter or spring, possibly with local epidemics at boarding schools or military bases.
 
Risk factors
Exposure to another person with meningococcal meningitis, recent URI.

meningococcal meningitis

Neurology Meningeal infection by N meningococcus, primarily of children, typically of rapid onset after a URI Epidemiology Often in winter or spring, possibly with local epidemics at boarding schools or military bases Risk factors Exposure to another person with MM, recent URI. See Meningitis.

me·nin·go·coc·cal me·nin·gi·tis

(mĕ-ning'gō-kok'ăl men-in-jī'tis)
An acute infectious disease affecting children and young adults, caused by Neisseria meningitidis; characterized by nasopharyngeal catarrh, headache, vomiting, convulsions, stiffness in the neck (nuchal rigidity), photophobia, constipation, cutaneous hyperesthesia, a purpuric or herpetic eruption, and the presence of Kernig sign. Fulminant form may cause Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome.

meningococcal meningitis

An epidemic form of MENINGITIS, sometimes called cerebrospinal fever or spotted fever, and commoner in children than in adults. The organism responsible, Neisseria meningitidis , is spread by coughed or sneezed droplets. There is early leg pain, cold hands and feet, pallor or mottling of the skin, then a sore throat, fever, severe headache, marked neck stiffness and vomiting. A rash of red spots appears on the trunk and the affected person may be gravely ill within a day of onset and quickly become confused, drowsy and comatose. Without treatment, death may occur within days or even hours but an intensive course of antibiotics is usually successful, resulting in full recovery. Vaccines are available. Contacts are sometimes given protective antibiotics.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, we would like to reiterate that there are no cases of meningococcal meningitis.
Clinical features, laboratory findings and management of meningococcal meningitis in England and Wales: report of a 1997 survey.
Overcrowding provides the ideal condition for the transmission of infections like typhoid, cholera and invasive meningococcal meningitis.
The letter listed the symptoms for swine flu and meningococcal meningitis so there could be no confusing the two.
An infectious disease of the brain and spinal cord, meningococcal meningitis can be passed through saliva.
Single-dose ceftriaxone should be considered as a first-line treatment alternative to oily chloramphenicol for epidemic meningococcal meningitis, according to N.
One has been diagnosed with meningococcal meningitis and is being treated in Caithness General Hospital, while the other has been taken to Raigmore Hospital in Inverness.
Dr Annette Wood, consultant in communicable disease in the Birmingham and Solihull HPU, said there has been two confirmed cases of meningococcal meningitis and three probable case, which had not yet been confirmed.
And in its contagious bacterial form, certain strains of meningitis can cause a brain disease - called meningococcal meningitis - or blood disease (meningococcemia), both of which can be deadly.
A spokesperson for the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, which is handling the incident, stated that there is 'no reason to believe that there are any other cases of meningitis,' and indicated that symptoms of meningococcal meningitis include fever, a stiff neck and headache.
Hooper, a British Conservative Party politician, was part of a team of SmithKline Beecham executives who visited Havana to discuss the pioneering accord agreed in July to market a vaccine against Group B meningococcal meningitis developed by Finlay Institute, a state medical research and production centers.
The new vaccine, which should be available within 18 months, will offer long-term protection against the dreaded C strain of the disease, which accounts for 40 per cent of meningococcal meningitis.