melorheostosis

melorheostosis

 [mel″o-re″os-to´sis]
a form of osteosclerosis, with linear tracks extending through the long bones.

mel·o·rhe·os·to·sis

(mel'ō-rē'os-tō'sis), [MIM*155950] Although the diagraph rh occurring at the beginning of a syllable in a word of Greek origin is ordinarily changed to rrh when a prefix or other lexical element is placed before it, the r is not doubled in this word.
Rheostosis confined to the long bones.
[G. melos, limb, + rheos, stream, + osteon, bone, + -ōsis]

melorheostosis

/melo·rhe·os·to·sis/ (mel″ŏ-re″os-to´sis) a form of osteosclerosis, with linear tracks extending through a long bone; see rheostosis.

melorheostosis

An idiopathic defect of long bone growth, characterised by cortical thickening of long (tubular) bones which, when stripped of muscle, simulates a candle with wax melted down a side.
 
Clinical findings
Pain, limitation of movement; contraction and/or fusion of joint spaces, usually of one limb.

melorheostosis

Lèri's disease An idiopathic defect of long bone growth, characterized by cortical thickening of long–tubular bones which, when stripped of muscle, simulates a candle with wax dribbled down a side Clinical Pain, limitation of movement, contraction and/or fusion of joint spaces, usually of one limb

mel·o·rhe·os·to·sis

(mel'ō-rē-os-tō'sis)
Rheostosis confined to the long bones.
[G. melos, limb, + rheos, stream, + osteon, bone, + -ōsis]

melorheostosis

; ivory bone formation rare hyperostosis of long bones of limbs, characterized by patchy linear sclerosis and cortical new bone formation

melorheostosis

a form of osteosclerosis, with linear tracks extending through the long bones.
References in periodicals archive ?
99mTc-pyrophosphate bone imaging in osteopoikilosis, osteopathia striata, and melorheostosis.
Osteopoikilosis had also been associated with nanism, spinal stenosis, dystocia [30], organ anomanies such douplicated ureter, aorta coarctation, endocrine disorders, disc protrusions, melorheostosis and tuberous sclerosis [22, 28].
Leri is associated with Melorheostosis, "candle bone disease", a rare disorder of bone (Leri-Joanny syndrome), Leri- J-E Weill syndrome (a skeletal dysplasia combining dorsal subluxation of the distal end of the ulna (Madelung deformity) with mesomelic short stature), and Leri sign (a pyramidal sign, or joint reflex seen in spastic hemiplegia) and Leri's disease-paroxysmal pain precipitated by exposure to cold and high humidity.
INTRODUCTION: Two French neurologists, Leri and Joanny (1922) published the first case in which an arm was affected, and suggested the descriptive title melorheostosis (1).
The other deferred microscope slide review required correlation with radiographic imaging to rule out melorheostosis.
Acquired macrodactyly includes dactylitis secondary to infection, infarction, and Still's disease; osteoid osteoma and melorheostosis and can be distinguished from the congenital type by the appearance at birth.
Increased bone density without modifcation of bone shape Osteopetrosis precocious type Generalised AR delayed type Type 1 uniform AD intermediate type Type 2 endobones with renal tubular Generalised AR AR acidosis Similar other types Axial osteosclerosis osteomesopyknosis Focal sclerosis AD AR with bamboo hair in vertebrae/pelvis Pycnodysostosis Generalised AR Osteosclerosis Cortical AD Stanesu type thickening of long bones, defcient facial sinus development Osteopathia striata Radiodense SP XLD isolated with striations on all cranial sclerosis bones with cranial sclerosis Sponastrime Striated AR dysplasia metaphysis Melorheostosis Flowing SP hyperostosis Osteopoikilosis Radiodense spots AD Mixed sclerosing Combined pattern SP bone dysplasia 2.
These features are pathognomonic of melorheostosis, a rare hyperostotic condition that is distinguished by a linear pattern of distribution along the axes of long bones [1].
Other differential diagnoses include: melorheostosis, mastocytosis, and tuberous sclerosis.
Loss of function mutations of the LEMD3 (MAN1) gene were shown to underlie disorders characterized by increased bone density, namely osteopoikilosis, Buschke-Ollendorff syndrome (BOS), and melorheostosis (9,10).
Radiologically, the differential diagnosis of OPK includes osteopathia striata, melorheostosis, tuberous sclerosis, sclerotic bone metastases, and osteoma (which may have similar clinical pictures but for which medical and orthopedic treatment may be necessary).
DISCUSSION: Melorheostosis is a rare non hereditary sclerosing bone dysplasia first described by the two French neurologists Leri and Joanny in 1922 (1).