melarsoprol


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Related to melarsoprol: Nifurtimox, Suramin, Eflornithine

melarsoprol

 [mel-ahr´so-prol]
an antiprotozoal agent effective against trypanosomes.

melarsoprol

An older arsenical used to treat trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease) and T brucei gambiense (which causes 95% of cases of sleeping sickness).

Adverse effects
Arsenic poisoning, convulsions, loss of consciousness, rash, fever, nausea, vomiting, bloody stool; treatment-related fatalities are not uncommon. Pentamidine is the drug of choice for first-stage T brucei gambiense infection. Other agents (suramin, eflornithine and nifurtimox) are available in the US from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

melarsoprol

A combination of melarsan oxide and dimercaprol used to treat TRYPANOSOMIASIS. The drug is highly effective but must be used with caution because of sometimes dangerous side effects including the JARISCH-HERXHEIMER REACTION. The drug is on the WHO official list.

melarsoprol

an antiprotozoal effective against Trypanosoma spp.
References in periodicals archive ?
Risk factors for encephalopathy and mortality during melarsoprol treatment of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense sleeping sickness.
dagger]) In frail patients, begin with 18 mg melarsoprol and progressively increase dose (3).
Because melarsoprol has a low solubility in water, it is dissolved in propylene glycol and administered intravenously.
1,3,6) The major adverse reaction caused by melarsoprol occurs in about 5-10% of treated cases and is called encephalopathic syndrome; a syndrome which is fatal for 10-70% of patients.
Eflornithine was unavailable and treatment with melarsoprol continued.
We found 1 case report describing successful use of suramin, followed by melarsoprol, in a pregnant woman with HAT (7).
A retrospective chart review of 4,925 human African trypanosomiasis patients treated with melarsoprol in 2001-2003 in Equateur Nord Province of the Democratic Republic of Congo showed a treatment failure rate of 19.
Melarsoprol, a drug developed in the 1940s, is toxic and the side effects kill about 5% of the patients.
With the exception of antimalarials, there are currently only four drugs (suramine developed in 1921; pentamidine developed in 1941; melarsoprol developed in 1949 and eflornithine developed in 1990) approved to treat HAT (Mackey et al.
Clinical description of encephalopathic syndromes and risk factors for their occurrence and outcome during melarsoprol treatment of human African trypanosomiasis.