melancholia


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

melancholia

 [mel″an-ko´le-ah]
depression; currently used particularly to describe severe cases of major depressive disorder. adj., adj melanchol´ic.

mel·an·cho·li·a

(mel'ăn-kō'lē-ă),
1. A severe form of depression marked by anhedonia, insomnia, psychomotor changes, and guilt.
2. A symptom occurring in other conditions, marked by depression of spirits and by a sluggish and painful process of thought.
Synonym(s): melancholy
[melan- + G. cholē, bile. See humoral doctrine]

melancholia

/mel·an·cho·lia/ (mel″an-ko´le-ah) depression; curently used to denote severe forms of major depressive disorder.melanchol´ic

melancholia

(mĕl′ən-kō′lē-ə)
n.
Extreme, persistent sadness or hopelessness; depression. No longer in clinical use.

mel′an·cho′li·ac (-lē-ăk′) adj. & n.

melancholia

[mel′angkō′lē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, melas, black, chole, bile
a severe form of depression. Also called melancholy. See also depression, major depressive disorder. melancholic, adj.

melancholia

Medical history
In ancient usage, melancholia encompassed schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.
 
Psychiatry
In modern use, melanocholia refers to an array of mental or emotional symptoms of depression or despondency, which are now subsumed under major and minor depression and dysthymia.

Psychoanalysis
Severe depression characterised by a loss of interest in life activities, early morning awakening with intensification of symptoms, variable functionality, anorexia, weight loss and inappropriate sense of guilt. 

Melancholia contrasts to prolonged mourning (melancholy); Freud viewed melancholia as an impoverishment of the ego as there is an internal loss, while in mourning the loss is external. Because of the internal loss, the melancholic ego appears empty and has a shattered self-esteem, due to reproach and attack from the superego. It is more common in women and is accompanied by helplessness and suicide attempts or ideation.

melancholia

melan, Greek, black; chole, bile Psychiatry Psychotic depression similar/identical to the depression of bipolar disease, characterized by severe depression, loss of interest in life activities, early morning awakening with intensification of Sx, marked ↑/↓ functionality, anorexia, weight loss, inappropriate sense of guilt. See Involutional melancholia. Cf Melancholy.

mel·an·cho·li·a

(mel-ăn-kō'lē-ă)
1. A severe form of depression marked by anhedonia, insomnia, psychomotor changes, and guilt.
2. A symptom occurring in other conditions, marked by depression of spirits and by a sluggish and painful process of thought.
Synonym(s): melancholy.
[melan- + G. cholē, bile]

melancholia

DEPRESSION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Just as melancholia can be rethought in terms of women's collective activism in Gundermann's work, resentment may be reconsidered as a collective emotion.
The notion of melancholia as an ambivalent site of refusal and incorporation of a loss the ego cannot grieve stands as the primary framework for affective human development.
Instead of the disburdening effect of seeing a world out of balance and a corrupt culture destroyed, Melancholia dwells on the characters' personal relationships with their impending death.
Wagner's seminal work signalled a move away from the Romantic epoch of classical composition, a shift that Melancholia seems to take its cues from--it is at once elegantly composed and subversive in its disregard for the 'rules' of film form.
As we come to the last page of the book, we encounter the summary statement: "By examining the history of melancholia and depression, we can see that the depressed patient is not reducible to a biochemical deficient machine, but an individual embedded in a complex social environment" (p.
Von Trier, in Melancholia, is also as critical of conventional faith as Bergman in The Seventh Seal, and as languorous about life as Tarkovsky in The Sacrifice.
It seems something is terribly wrong with the predicted trajectory of Melancholia, and that Earth is on a collision course with the mysterious blue planet.
Because Melancholia isn't only a profound, beautiful, and terrifying film; it's also a wild and courageous exploration of the same sentiment that got von Trier into so much trouble: the cosmic inevitability of Hitler.
Meanwhile, Melancholia ominously sails closer towards the earth as John and Claire begin to lose their composure.
uk Melancholia (15): Lars von Trier's film about depression and being doomed.
The other is planet Melancholia, which is on a collision course with us.