medication error


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medication error

any incorrect or wrongful administration of a medication, such as a mistake in dosage or route of administration, failure to prescribe or administer the correct drug or formulation for a particular disease or condition, use of outdated drugs, failure to observe the correct time for administration of the drug, or lack of awareness of adverse effects of certain drug combinations. Causes of medication error may include difficulty in reading handwritten orders, confusion about different drugs with similar names, and lack of information about a patient's drug allergies or sensitivities. When the nurse is in doubt, administration of a drug should be delayed until specifically authorized by a physician.

medication error

Any preventable event that may cause or lead to inappropriate medication use or patient harm while the medication is in the control of the healthcare professional, patient or consumer. The patient must actually receive the drug for it to be classified as a medication error.

Types
Prescribing, omission, unauthorised drug, improper dose, deteriorated drug, compliance error.

medication error

Malpractice An error in the type of medication administered or dosage. See Adverse effect, Error.

med·i·ca·tion er·ror

(med'i-kā'shŭn er'ŏr)
Incorrect administration of a medication. May be due to incorrect dosage, drug, patient, time or route of administration, or interaction between incompatible medications.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the United States, the US Food and Drug Administration reports medication errors cause at least one death every day and injure approximately 1.
In both years, 44% of trainees made at least one medication error, with 11% (7 of 64) making a 10-fold or greater error in dosage.
Because preceptor training traditionally does not include formal education on medication error reduction strategies, a study on preceptor knowledge of medication error reduction strategies was indicated.
An incident-reporting database contained information for medication errors using the National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention (NCC MERP, 2005) taxonomy (error types A-I) for the time period.
Only 88% of participants made use of a medication error notification system, and this was predominantly (71.
Key words: Medication error, irrational drug use, drug interactions, frequency.
Not only did the NCC MERP produce the nation's first comprehensive taxonomy for studying medication errors, it also established the following definition of a medication error: A medication error is any preventable event that may cause or lead to inappropriate medication use or patient harm while the medication is in the control of the health care professional, patient, or consumer.
The packet also includes court documents, written discovery, and depositions of various health care workers involved in medication error cases, including nurses, anesthesiologists, a neurosurgeon, residents, and a medical director.
Instead of attempting to hide a mistake, nurses took appropriate steps in medication error reporting (Dickens, 2007).
Unfortunately, patients are not the only people who suffer as a result of grave medication errors.
This article will discuss medication error prevention, and its relationship to the issues of floating, nurse-physician relations, and critical incident debriefing.

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