meconium-stained amniotic fluid

meconium-stained amniotic fluid

Amniotic fluid with a greenish discoloration, which may indicate fetal distress. See Fetal distress.
References in periodicals archive ?
Maternal records were also reviewed for maternal age, parity, maternal HIV results, antenatal care, maternal disease, mode of delivery, presence of fetal distress or meconium-stained amniotic fluid and cardiotocographic records.
3% were born to mothers with meconium-stained amniotic fluid.
Meconium aspiration syndrome is a life-threatening condition that affects 2% to 5% of infants born through meconium-stained amniotic fluid.
The approach to preventing MAS in the newborn has changed drastically over the past 30 years from a more aggressive approach (upper-airway suctioning of all infants born through meconium-stained amniotic fluid before delivery of the shoulders followed by tracheal intubation and suctioning immediately after delivery) to a selective approach (intubating and suctioning immediately after delivery only those infants who are depressed at birth).
While an observational study of this type cannot assume causality, it is an interesting association that was noted between cases of MAS and meconium-stained amniotic fluid and the source of the drinking water.
From the above data, it appears that the source, quality, and type of water ingested during pregnancy may be a risk factor for MAS and meconium-stained amniotic fluid noted at birth.
Saline amnioinfusion for labors with thickly meconium-stained amniotic fluid does not prevent meconium aspiration syndrome, William D.
A high prevalence of meconium-stained amniotic fluid is an outstanding feature among the intrapartum and asphyxial neonatal deaths.
Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is a serious, life-threatening respiratory disorder of the newborn that occurs in approximately 2% to 5% of infants born through meconium-stained amniotic fluid (MSAf) (1).
In a study of women with meconium-stained amniotic fluid and no signs of clinical infection, randomization to treatment with antibiotics resulted in a significant decrease in the intraamniotic infection rate.
SAN FRANCISCO -- Intrapartum aspiration of term infants with meconium-stained amniotic fluid before shoulder delivery did not alter the risk for developing meconium aspiration syndrome in a prospective, randomized, controlled trial in 2,481 patients.