meconium staining

meconium staining

The deposition of meconium on skin, placenta, mucosa and other foetal surfaces, which may indicate foetal distress.

Passage of meconium in utero is due to bowel peristalsis and relaxation of the anal sphincter. Diffusion of meconium components into the placenta and cord may lead to vasoconstriction and hypoperfusion; the damage to foetus increases with length of exposure, and places the foetus at risk of meconium aspiration.

meconium staining

Fetal defecation of meconium while in utero during labor. It may cause staining of the amniotic fluid or of the infant.

Patient care

Meconium must be suctioned from the newborn's mouth and trachea before the first breath in order to prevent aspiration.

References in periodicals archive ?
Most authors agree that histologic meconium staining poorly correlates with clinical conditions that are potentially complicated by fetal hypoxia, (9,91,96) and histologic meconium is not a feature of fetal distress.
The doctors diagnosed the baby of meconium aspiration syndrome without evidence to support their conclusion, such as meconium staining of amniotic fluid.
8, respectively), but several were less common: chorionamnionitis, fetal intolerance of labor and meconium staining (0.
Introduction: Meconium staining of the amniotic fluid is a common occurrence in pregnancy.
Meconium staining provides additional information about the timing of a neurologic injury.
The probability of the fetal complications of spontaneous preterm deliveries, asphyxial events, and meconium staining of amniotic fluid, placenta, and membranes rose by 1%-2% for each additional [micro]mol/L of maternal serum bile acid when the total level of bile acids exceeded 40 [micro]mol/L.
6% of those using HMPs had grade II-III meconium staining of liquor (rates of caesarean section = 22% and 38.
There is a much higher incidence of meconium staining, premature aspiration of meconium (in utero), meconium aspiration syndrome, and more reports of "failure to thrive" babies.
Although the presence of meconium alone is not conclusive, many medical authorities agree that meconium staining is at least consistent with fetal distress and must be dealt with promptly.
Moreover, such placental lesions, showing histologic evidence of meconium staining and chorangiosis, were more common with membrane hypoxic lesions occurring without, rather than with, infarctions.
The rates and types of antenatal complications were similar, as were the number of inductions, use of oxytocin, and rates of meconium staining.