mechanical restraint


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mechanical restraint

Etymology: Gk, mechane + L, restringere, to confine
a device made of fabric that hinders a patient's movement, such as a safety vest, hand and wrist straps, mittens, and a stretcher equipped with belts. See also restraint.

mechanical restraint

Any restrictive device (e.g., seatbelt, straitjacket (camisole), vest, or physical confinement) used to restrict a person’s free movement, most commonly in emergency situations.

Indications
Unsteadiness, wandering, disruptive behaviour, often secondary to psychiatric conditions and/or dementia; patients may also require pharmacologic restraints.

mechanical restraint

Physical restaint A device used on a person to restrict free movement–eg, seatbelt, straitjacket–camisole, vest, or physical confinement Indications Unsteadiness, wandering, disruptive behavior, often 2º to psychiatric conditions and/or dementia; Pts may also require pharmacologic restraints. See Restraint, Pharmacologic restraint.

mechanical restraint

Restraint by physical devices.
See also: restraint
References in periodicals archive ?
58) The parents had signed a contract stating, "When it becomes necessary, in the sole discretion of the Program, to restrain a Student, the Sponsors authorize the Program to use pepper spray (or electrical disabler, mace, mechanical restraints, handcuffs).
120 In general, there are three types of restraints--physical, (121) mechanical, (122) and chemical (123)--but schools and transportation services primarily use physical and mechanical restraints.
Physical and mechanical restraints are used frequently in the special-education setting.
In fact, the use of physical and mechanical restraints varied widely among programs of similar size and security level, as well as the type of population served.
The statewide average rate of physical and mechanical restraints during the period of July 1, 2009, through June 30, 2010, was 2.
People who have behavior disorders that co-occur with a mental illness or mental retardation are the ones at risk to receive chemical restraints, physical restraints, mechanical restraints, and seclusion.
5-15) has left many public and private providers without a comprehensive array of service options that has resulted in an increase in the use of coercive procedures, including the overuse and misuse of chemical restraints, physical restraints, mechanical restraints, and seclusion.
Mechanical restraints are leather or cloth devices, bedrails, or geri-chairs, used to modify the behavior of an individual through the limitation of physical movement.
Thus, as Rubenstein and colleagues have noted, the use of mechanical restraints appears to have emerged as a "standard of care by consensus rather than by scientific data.
It bans restraint that restricts airflow, mechanical restraints such as strapping children to chairs or duct-taping body parts, mandates notification to parents, and prohibits behavior-controlling medications that aren't prescribed by doctors.
The scope of work includes, but is not limited to the furnishing and installing of all pipes, valves, blow-offs, bends, couplings, mechanical restraints, fire hydrants, all fittings, and worker protection from tie hazard of caving ground.
CHDC also continues to utilize 41 different forms of mechanical restraints on both children and adults, including straitjackets, restraint chairs and papoose boards - practices that have been largely barred from other facilities for years.

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