mechanical restraint


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mechanical restraint

Etymology: Gk, mechane + L, restringere, to confine
a device made of fabric that hinders a patient's movement, such as a safety vest, hand and wrist straps, mittens, and a stretcher equipped with belts. See also restraint.

mechanical restraint

Any restrictive device (e.g., seatbelt, straitjacket (camisole), vest, or physical confinement) used to restrict a person’s free movement, most commonly in emergency situations.

Indications
Unsteadiness, wandering, disruptive behaviour, often secondary to psychiatric conditions and/or dementia; patients may also require pharmacologic restraints.

mechanical restraint

Physical restaint A device used on a person to restrict free movement–eg, seatbelt, straitjacket–camisole, vest, or physical confinement Indications Unsteadiness, wandering, disruptive behavior, often 2º to psychiatric conditions and/or dementia; Pts may also require pharmacologic restraints. See Restraint, Pharmacologic restraint.

mechanical restraint

Restraint by physical devices.
See also: restraint
References in periodicals archive ?
found that restrictions short of mechanical restraints and involuntary hospitalization could give rise to a right to treatment.
It was widely believed among FDJJ residential service providers that secure programs and programs that serve youths with highly specialized treatment needs would be more likely to use physical and mechanical restraints in order to maintain security and prevent injurious (including self-injurious) behavior.
Ban mechanical restraints, such as putting children in Rifton Chairs, or taping or tying them to chairs or furniture, or locking them into devices.
However, self-mutilating behaviour and persistent violent physical struggling against mechanical restraints with the risk of exhaustion may require chemical restraint.
Four guards successfully placed him in mechanical restraints.
They will be able to restrain us and to use mechanical restraints to do so.
The report calls for cuts in the use of strip searching by at least 50 per cent and a ban on mechanical restraints and severe restrictions on the use of physical force, which should never be used to secure compliance or as a punishment
Gay does include a brief discussion of masturbation but does not go beyond the standard secondary sources: he follows Spitz in describing some of the remedies as "draconian" and "sadistic," likewise noting that after the 1850s the "innocuous cures" (41) favoured by earlier physicians gave way to "a formidable armamentarium of mechanical restraints resembling .
Nurse Wiegers directed the mental health workers to separate Dexter and Davis by putting Davis in the unit's "quiet room," which had a mattress on the floor, and Dexter in the unit's "four-point room," which had a bed with four-point mechanical restraints.
This has resulted in a move away from providing direct treatment of behavior dysfunction and an increase in the use of high dosages of psychoactive medications, leading in many cases to unnecessary chemical restraints, mechanical restraints, and seclusion (see Hunter, 1995; Hunter, 1999; Hunter, 2000).
But the district court denied summary judgment for the defendants on the issue of whether the officials knew that keeping the prisoner in mechanical restraints during his exercise period violated the Eighth Amendment.
Mechanical restraints on the medical wards: Are protective devices safe?

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