maturation

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maturation

 [mach″u-ra´shun]
1. the stage or process of attaining maximal development; attainment of maximal intellectual and emotional development.
2. in biology, a process of cell division during which the number of chromosomes in the germ cell is reduced to half the number characteristic of the species.

mat·u·ra·tion

(mat'yū-rā'shŭn),
1. Achievement of full development or growth.
2. Developmental changes that lead to maturity.
3. Processing of a macromolecule, for example, posttranscriptional modification of RNA or posttranslational modification of proteins.
4. The overall process leading to the incorporation of a viral genome into a capsid and the development of a complete virion.
[L. maturatio, a ripening, fr. maturus, ripe]

maturation

/mat·u·ra·tion/ (mach-u-ra´shun)
1. the process of becoming mature.
2. attainment of emotional and intellectual maturity.
3. in biology, a process of cell division during which the number of chromosomes in the germ cells is reduced to one half the number characteristic of the species.

maturation

(măch′ə-rā′shən)
n.
1. The process of becoming mature.
2. Biology
a. The processes by which gametes are formed, including the reduction of chromosomes in a germ cell from the diploid number to the haploid number by meiosis.
b. The final differentiation processes in biological systems, such as the final ripening of a seed or the attainment of full functional capacity by a cell, a tissue, or an organ.

mat′u·ra′tion·al adj.
mat′u·ra′tive adj.

maturation

[mach′ərā′shən]
Etymology: L, maturare, to ripen
1 the process or condition of attaining complete development. In humans it is the unfolding of full physical, emotional, and intellectual capacities that enable a person to function at a higher level of competency and adaptability within the environment.
2 the final stages in the meiotic formation of germ cells in which the number of chromosomes in each cell is reduced to the haploid number characteristic of the species. See also meiosis, oogenesis, spermatogenesis.
3 suppuration. maturate, v.

maturation

The process of development.

mat·u·ra·tion

(mach'ūr-ā'shŭn)
1. Achievement of full development or growth.
2. Developmental changes that lead to maturity.
3. Processing of a macromolecule; e.g., posttranscriptional modification of RNA or posttranslational modification of proteins.

maturation (viral)

the collection of infective VIRIONS produced in the host cell.

Maturation

The process by which stem cells transform from immature cells without a specific function into a particular type of blood cell with defined functions.
Mentioned in: Leukemias, Chronic

mat·u·ra·tion

(mach'ūr-ā'shŭn)
Achievement of full development or growth.

maturation (mach´ərā´shən),

n the process through which an organism or body structure arrives at a state of complete development. In dentistry, this is the point at which an individual's periodontium or its parts have reached their full adult form, size, and function.

maturation

1. the stage or process of attaining maximal development. In biology, a process of cell division during which the number of chromosomes in the germ cell is reduced to one-half the number characteristic of the species.
2. the formation of pus.

maturation arrest
an interruption in the progressive development of erythrocytes, characterized by a bone marrow dominated by macrocytes and megaloblasts. Seen in anemias caused by deficiency of folic acid and vitamin B12.
References in periodicals archive ?
With regard to the categorization of the most cited articles, the maturational trends show both positive and negative indicators of growth.
Our study challenges the efficacy of the maturational supposition of uninterrupted linear expansion by adopting a non-linear explanation of digitized government--one that follows the established S-curve theory of innovation diffusion (Rogers, 2003).
77 TABLE 2 Maturational Variables of Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR) and Control Groups IUGR Controls Variable M SD M SD t Gestational age (weeks) 36.
A pregnant girl may face maturational and educational losses as well as friends and family.
My own research on pediatric critical care nurses' grief revealed that being with dying patients and their families is never easy, and facing one's own mortality, particularly in a society that prefers to deny it, is a maturational, reflective journey, perhaps not so different from the one Chen has experienced as a surgeon.
This creates a maturational gap that leads to extra burdens and challenges with direct clinical relevance, Dr.
Super (1957) saw adaptability as a maturational phenomenon in which an individual develops coping skills to manage his or her life space, clarify vocational identity issues, and master career-related tasks associated with developmental stages.
Relationship between tooth formation and other maturational factors.
Critical period effects in second language learning: The maturational state on the acquisition of English as a second language.
This current study would appear to suggest that enamel malformation in the diabetic animals may be due to decreased secretional and maturational function of the ameloblasts, rather than through a deficiency of calcium and phosphorus.
However, permanent or transient elevation of blood galactose is found in galactosaemia, liver dysfunction or maturational delay of galactose transport or utilisation, (5) and then can indeed affect measurements and clinical judgement.
The Maturational Process and the Facilitating Environment.