maturation


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Related to maturation: sperm maturation

maturation

 [mach″u-ra´shun]
1. the stage or process of attaining maximal development; attainment of maximal intellectual and emotional development.
2. in biology, a process of cell division during which the number of chromosomes in the germ cell is reduced to half the number characteristic of the species.

mat·u·ra·tion

(mat'yū-rā'shŭn),
1. Achievement of full development or growth.
2. Developmental changes that lead to maturity.
3. Processing of a macromolecule, for example, posttranscriptional modification of RNA or posttranslational modification of proteins.
4. The overall process leading to the incorporation of a viral genome into a capsid and the development of a complete virion.
[L. maturatio, a ripening, fr. maturus, ripe]

maturation

/mat·u·ra·tion/ (mach-u-ra´shun)
1. the process of becoming mature.
2. attainment of emotional and intellectual maturity.
3. in biology, a process of cell division during which the number of chromosomes in the germ cells is reduced to one half the number characteristic of the species.

maturation

(măch′ə-rā′shən)
n.
1. The process of becoming mature.
2. Biology
a. The processes by which gametes are formed, including the reduction of chromosomes in a germ cell from the diploid number to the haploid number by meiosis.
b. The final differentiation processes in biological systems, such as the final ripening of a seed or the attainment of full functional capacity by a cell, a tissue, or an organ.

mat′u·ra′tion·al adj.
mat′u·ra′tive adj.

maturation

[mach′ərā′shən]
Etymology: L, maturare, to ripen
1 the process or condition of attaining complete development. In humans it is the unfolding of full physical, emotional, and intellectual capacities that enable a person to function at a higher level of competency and adaptability within the environment.
2 the final stages in the meiotic formation of germ cells in which the number of chromosomes in each cell is reduced to the haploid number characteristic of the species. See also meiosis, oogenesis, spermatogenesis.
3 suppuration. maturate, v.

maturation

The process of development.

mat·u·ra·tion

(mach'ūr-ā'shŭn)
1. Achievement of full development or growth.
2. Developmental changes that lead to maturity.
3. Processing of a macromolecule; e.g., posttranscriptional modification of RNA or posttranslational modification of proteins.

maturation (viral)

the collection of infective VIRIONS produced in the host cell.

Maturation

The process by which stem cells transform from immature cells without a specific function into a particular type of blood cell with defined functions.
Mentioned in: Leukemias, Chronic

mat·u·ra·tion

(mach'ūr-ā'shŭn)
Achievement of full development or growth.

maturation (mach´ərā´shən),

n the process through which an organism or body structure arrives at a state of complete development. In dentistry, this is the point at which an individual's periodontium or its parts have reached their full adult form, size, and function.

maturation

1. the stage or process of attaining maximal development. In biology, a process of cell division during which the number of chromosomes in the germ cell is reduced to one-half the number characteristic of the species.
2. the formation of pus.

maturation arrest
an interruption in the progressive development of erythrocytes, characterized by a bone marrow dominated by macrocytes and megaloblasts. Seen in anemias caused by deficiency of folic acid and vitamin B12.
References in periodicals archive ?
In brief, it would be useful to clarify whether distinct techniques to determine maturation status can actually discriminate children with different biological age within initial soccer categories.
Although the growth of in vitro preantral follicles can result in fertilizable oocytes and successful childbirth (9), the technique of In Vitro Maturation (IVM) needs to be further enhanced because GV oocytes have a reasonable ability to mature and reach the Metaphase II (MII) stage.
Age estimation using cervical vertebrae has been increasingly used to assess skeletal maturation instead of the hand-wrist bone age in recent years (1, 6-8, 12-18).
Although serum has an inevitable ability to support oocyte maturation and embryo development in vitro, there are certain disadvantages.
Rainey BJ et al28 determine the reliability and reproducibility of Cervical Vertebrae Maturation (CVM) stages assessment amongst orthodontists in training and specialist orthodontists, looking at a sample of consecutive lateral cephalograms taken at Liverpool University Dental Hospital.
The stage of meiotic maturation was determined by examination of the presence or absence of the first polar body (metaphase II) under UV light.
I didn't think that within just 12 months we would be opening our third cheese maturation cave to fulfil demand.
That may explain why iPSC-derived cells have maturation problems.
Previous studies have been conducted related to the main changes that occur during the maturation of jabuticabas.