matter

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Related to matter-of-fact: matter-of-factly, expeditiously, a matter of course

matter

 [mat´er]
1. physical material having form and weight under ordinary conditions; called also substance.
2. pus.
gray matter areas of the nervous system where the nerve fibers are unmyelinated (not enveloped by a myelin sheath); it contains the bodies of the nerve cells. Tissue composed of myelinated fibers is called white matter. The cerebral cortex is entirely composed of gray matter and the cerebellum also contains some deep-seated masses of it. The spinal cord has a central core of gray matter surrounded by white matter; in cross section, its gray matter is shaped approximately like the letter H. Called also substantia grisea and gray substance.
white matter areas of the nervous system composed mostly of myelinated nerve fibers (those having myelin sheaths) constituting the conducting portion of the brain and spinal cord. Tissue composed of unmyelinated fibers is called gray matter. Called also substantia alba and white substance.

sub·stance

(sŭb'stănts),
Material.
Synonym(s): substantia [TA], matter
[L. substantia, essence, material, fr. sub- sto, to stand under, be present]

matter

/mat·ter/ (mat´er)
1. substance; anything that occupies space.
2. pus.

gray matter  substantia grisea.
white matter  substantia alba.

matter

(măt′ər)
n.
1. A specific type of substance.
2. Discharge or waste, such as pus or feces, from a living organism.

matter

Etymology: L, materia
1 anything that has mass and occupies space.
2 any substance not otherwise identified as to its constituents, such as gray matter, pus, or serum exuding from a wound.

matter

Anatomy
Material substance that occupies cavities.

Physics
Material substance that occupies space.

matter

Anatomy Stuff that occupies cavities. See Gray matter, White matter.

sub·stance

(sŭb'stăns)
Material.
Synonym(s): substantia [TA] , matter.
[L. substantia, essence, material, fr. sub-sto, to stand under, be present]

matter

that which constitutes the substance of physical forms, has mass, occupies space and can be quantified.

matter

1. physical material having form and weight under ordinary conditions of gravity.
2. pus.

gray matter
matter of the central nervous system, which represents the aggregations of the nerve cells.
white matter
matter of the central nervous system, which comprises the axons of the nerve cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
Totally passionless communication will bore engineers, and there's a difference between matter-of-fact and monotone, in speech and prose alike.
He tells his story in a matter-of-fact tone, which makes the tragedy of his world all the more poignant.
Each sentence relays the matter-of-fact tale from a different vantage point: Kenny wonders what's taking the woman so long; she is frightened by the man's running and waits until his bus pulls away before continuing to the car; the other man realizes that she has crossed the street to avoid him, and IT MADE HIM SICK THAT WHEN PEOPLE SEE A BLACK MAN RUN THEY THINK THAT HE WANTS TO ATTACK THEM.
Violence is abundant and disturbingly matter-of-fact in Our Lady of the Assassins.
The clear organization, matter-of-fact and accessible writing (although some "Britishisms" might take getting used to) and the respectful attitude toward children with ASD make this a good pick for teen parenting collections.
A bibliography and index round out this involving chronicle recommended for anyone interested in a matter-of-fact overview of why we are what we eat and so much more.
While it's difficult to detect a trace of humor in her matter-of-fact speaking voice, Molina got the job.
A large, matter-of-fact pastel of a newspaper page featuring the sweet face of another adolescent male killer--King, a twelve-year-old Florida boy, conspired with his thirteen-year-old brother to murder their father in 2001--it evoked the mechanisms whereby the media's endless reiteration of these personal cataclysms contributes to the sense, for certain vulnerable individuals, that acts of sociopathic violence offer some cathartic chance at individuation in the public eye.
In places lavishly illustrated, it is punctuated by several of its subject's own matter-of-fact yet inspirational texts, from 'The Innermost Being of Architecture' (shades of Heidegger) to 'Dear Aarhus Eleven' (a taped address to students).
Although Curtis has been matter-of-fact about her lesbian status throughout the 12-year span of her performing career, she's previously opted for first-person lyrics wherein sexuality was often suggested but rarely confirmed.
His matter-of-fact baritone delivery has an undertone that makes us want to believe and trust him, even as we become passive accomplices to his crime.
Meticulously reconstructing details and events from the critical battle that would capture Vicksburg and divide the Confederacy, Triumph & Defeat narrates history in a matter-of-fact tone that clarifies the complex interplay of forces, personalities, and events.