matter


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Related to matter: States of matter

matter

 [mat´er]
1. physical material having form and weight under ordinary conditions; called also substance.
2. pus.
gray matter areas of the nervous system where the nerve fibers are unmyelinated (not enveloped by a myelin sheath); it contains the bodies of the nerve cells. Tissue composed of myelinated fibers is called white matter. The cerebral cortex is entirely composed of gray matter and the cerebellum also contains some deep-seated masses of it. The spinal cord has a central core of gray matter surrounded by white matter; in cross section, its gray matter is shaped approximately like the letter H. Called also substantia grisea and gray substance.
white matter areas of the nervous system composed mostly of myelinated nerve fibers (those having myelin sheaths) constituting the conducting portion of the brain and spinal cord. Tissue composed of unmyelinated fibers is called gray matter. Called also substantia alba and white substance.

sub·stance

(sŭb'stănts),
Material.
Synonym(s): substantia [TA], matter
[L. substantia, essence, material, fr. sub- sto, to stand under, be present]

matter

/mat·ter/ (mat´er)
1. substance; anything that occupies space.
2. pus.

gray matter  substantia grisea.
white matter  substantia alba.

matter

(măt′ər)
n.
1. A specific type of substance.
2. Discharge or waste, such as pus or feces, from a living organism.

matter

Etymology: L, materia
1 anything that has mass and occupies space.
2 any substance not otherwise identified as to its constituents, such as gray matter, pus, or serum exuding from a wound.

matter

Anatomy
Material substance that occupies cavities.

Physics
Material substance that occupies space.

matter

Anatomy Stuff that occupies cavities. See Gray matter, White matter.

sub·stance

(sŭb'stăns)
Material.
Synonym(s): substantia [TA] , matter.
[L. substantia, essence, material, fr. sub-sto, to stand under, be present]

matter

that which constitutes the substance of physical forms, has mass, occupies space and can be quantified.

matter

1. physical material having form and weight under ordinary conditions of gravity.
2. pus.

gray matter
matter of the central nervous system, which represents the aggregations of the nerve cells.
white matter
matter of the central nervous system, which comprises the axons of the nerve cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
Importance is the experience of being the object of support and concern to others who matter.
It's exciting to wonder if it could be dark matter interacting with itself," says Neal Weiner, a theoretical physicist at New York University.
Matter management software provides a centralized approach to tracking which matters are in play and which resources are being used.
The nature of dark matter is a mystery - a mystery that the new study has only deepened.
6 : a small quantity or amount <The difference is a matter of ten cents.
At the end, it won't matter where you came from, or on what side of the tracks you lived.
Still, MOND remains popular with only a tiny minority of scientists because of its seemingly ad-hoc nature, the fact that dark matter helps explain many different types of astronomical observations, and because leading theories predict the existence of particles (such as WIMPs) that would have dark matter's properties.
They suggested that mattering to others is actually essential to our sense of self(all human beings want to matter to others) and to society (as an element of social bonding).
By studying the collision carefully, scientists now say that they have found the first evidence of dark matter in the universe.
As planned, the new particulate matter standards are stiffer than current pollution limits, but they're more relaxed than what the EPA's own scientific advisory council recommended.
The consultants conclude that a trusting relationship with "25 or 30 randomly selected employees among tens of thousands doesn't matter.
A little-known group with an unwieldy name--the Primate's Theological Commission--has begun work on a question put to it by General Synod last year: is the blessing of same-sex relationships a matter of doctrine, that is, something essential to the Christian faith as expressed by the Anglican church, or not?