mathematics disorder

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mathematics disorder

A condition characterised by difficulties in performing simple mathematic equations, such as counting, adding and subtracting. An estimated 6% of US elementary-age children have some degree of math disorder.

mathematics disorder

Math disability Psychology A condition characterized by difficulties in performing simple mathematic equations–eg, counting, adding. See Math anxiety.
References in periodicals archive ?
Challenges in identifying target skills for math disability screening and intervention.
Swanson and German [25] in a meta-analysis on the literatures concerning mathematics learning disability stated that those who have math disability compared to normal ones have significantly weaker performance on verbal working memory, working visual-spatial memory and long term memory.
It is estimated that between 5-8% of all school age children have a math disability (MD) as determined by the dual discrepancy model (Geary, 2003).
The TerraNova Achievement Test was used as the universal screening measure to determine at-risk status for a math disability (MD), reading disability (RD) or both (MRD).
Learning Disability-Related Cognitive Processing- Terms Related Terms General terms low achiev * cognitiv * process * remedi * menta * process * LD though * process * Id working memory learn * disabil * verbal IQ Specific terms High-incidence disability * processing speed HID phonological process * math disability fact retrieval dyscalculia automatic retrieval math * performance visual memory math * ability * visio-spatial research * math * assessment stud * comparison test * math * exam math * tests * reading disability dyslexia read * performance read * ability read * assessment read * exam read * tests Figure 2.
Linda Simpson's 18-year-old daughter suffers from attention deficit disorder and a severe math disability, resulting in a poor concept of time and extreme anxiety if she has to count change.
Participants with ADHD or comorbid reading disabilities (Jordan, Kaplan, & Hanich, 2002) were not included in Studies 1-3, as the performance of such participants is substantially different from that of children classified exclusively with a math disability (Seidman, Biederman, Monuteaux, Doyle, & Faraone, 2001).
While the definition of learning disabilities has been the subject of controversy for decades, the current federal classification system identifies three specific areas of deficit: reading, written language, and mathematics and maintains the presumption that the disabilities are a result of a central nervous system dysfunction, in contrast to the expansive literature base in language arts, research on math disability is far less developed and continues to lack an empirically-based identification of core deficits.
A meta-analysis of 58 math studies (Kroesbergen & Van Luit, 2003) revealed that students with math disability benefit more from explicit instruction than from discovery-oriented methods.
Of these students, 127 were designated at risk for math disability and randomly assigned to secondary preventative tutoring or to remain in their first-grade classrooms without tutoring.