mask

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mask

 [mask]
1. a covering for the face, as a bandage, an apparatus for administering anesthesia or oxygen, or a cloth that prevents droplets from the mouth and nose from spreading in the air.
A standard face mask. From Lammon et al., 1996.
2. to cover or conceal, as the masking of the nature of a disorder by unassociated signs or organisms.
3. in audiometry, to obscure or diminish a sound by the presence of another sound of different frequency.
mask of pregnancy popular term for melasma gravidarum.
Venturi mask see venturi mask.

mask

(mask),
1. Any of a variety of disease states or disorders that cause alteration or discoloration of the skin of the face.
2. The expressionless appearance seen in association with certain diseases; for example, Parkinson facies.
3. A facial bandage.
4. A shield designed to cover the mouth and nose for maintenance of antiseptic conditions.
5. A device designed to cover the mouth and nose for administration of inhalation anesthetics, oxygen, or other gases.

mask

(mask)
1. a covering or appliance for shading, protecting, or medicating the face.
2. to cover or conceal.
3. in audiometry, to obscure or diminish a sound by the presence of another sound of different frequency.
4. in dentistry, to camouflage metal parts of a prosthesis by covering with opaque material.

mask

(măsk)
n.
1. A covering for the nose and mouth that is used for inhaling oxygen or an anesthetic.
2. A covering worn over the nose and mouth, as by a surgeon or dentist, to prevent infection.
3. A facial bandage.
4. Any of various conditions producing alteration or discoloration of the skin of the face.
5. An expressionless appearance of the face seen in certain diseases, such as parkinsonism.
v.
To cover with a protective mask.

mask

Etymology: Fr, masque
1 v, to obscure, as in symptomatic treatment that may conceal the development of a disease.
2 v, to cover, as does a skin-toned cosmetic that may hide a pigmented nevus.
3 n, a cover worn over the nose and mouth to prevent inhalation of toxic or irritating materials, to control delivery of oxygen or anesthetic gas, or (by medical personnel) to shield a patient during aseptic procedures from pathogenic organisms normally exhaled from the respiratory tract. Surgical masks are worn by workers to help control the operating room environment during a patient procedure.
enlarge picture
Mask

mask

Audiology
verb To diminish or attenuate a sound with another.
 
Forensics
See Progressive purple mask of death.
 
Infectious control
noun A typically disposable personal protection device that covers the nose and mouth to prevent transmission of potentially infected aerosols from a patient to a healthcare worker, or vice versa.

Neurology
See Mask-like facies.
 
Psychology
noun A outward concealment of wishes or needs, often as an ego defence.

mask

Audiology verb To diminish or attenuate a sound with another Infectious control noun A usually disposable personal protection device that covers the nose to prevent transmission of potentially infected aerosols from a Pt to a health care worker–HCW or from an HCW to a Pt. See Isolation, Personal protection garment, Reverse isolation Psychology Barrier A concealment of wishes or needs, often as a ego defense.

mask

(mask)
1. Any of a variety of disease states producing alteration or discoloration of the skin of the face.
2. The expressionless appearance seen in certain diseases (e.g., Parkinson facies).
3. A facial bandage.
4. A shield designed to cover the mouth and nose for maintenance of aseptic conditions.
5. A device designed to cover the mouth and nose for administration of inhalation anesthetics, oxygen, or other gases.
See also: mission-oriented protective posture, gas mask

masking

A term describing any process whereby a detectable stimulus is made difficult or impossible to detect by the presentation of a second stimulus (called the mask). The main stimulus (typically called the target) may appear at the same time as the mask (simultaneous masking); or it may precede the mask (backward masking; example: metacontrast); or it may follow the mask (forward masking; example: paracontrast).

mask

(mask)
1. Any of a variety of disease states or disorders that cause alteration or discoloration of facial skin.
2. Expressionless appearance seen in association with some diseases, e.g., Parkinson facies.
3. Facial bandage.
4. Shield designed to cover mouth and nose for maintenance of antiseptic conditions.
5. Device designed to cover mouth and nose for administration of inhalation anesthetics, oxygen, or other gases.

mask

1. to cover or conceal, as the masking of the nature of a disorder by the presence of unassociated signs, organisms, etc.; in audiometry, to obscure or diminish a sound by the presence of another sound of different frequency.
2. an appliance for shading, protecting, or medicating the face, e.g. a surgical mask.
3. the dark shaded markings on the face of some dog and cat breeds.

Schimmelbusch mask
Venturi mask
see venturi mask.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a move prompted by the omnipresence of wireless tech, Masque purchased Florida-based Professional Wireless Systems in 2002.
In chapter 4, an exceptional survey of the masque and news nexus, Shohet argues for these forms as promulgating public opinion as a political force.
While acknowledging that her study of the inherent metatheatricality of Renaissance drama follows in a long tradition of exploring plays-within-plays in drama from this period, Rochester makes the case for the innovative nature of her approach, not only in terms of its focus on the woefully understudied figure of Massinger, but in her consideration of plays-within-plays and inset masques as conscious "enactments of spectatorship" (1).
Filewod is right that the Talonbooks 400th-anniversary reprint edition of Lescarbot's masque comes more fully alive when confronted with the multi-media performative cyberspace Sinking Neptune.
Frost started working in the summer of 1943 on a short play he would call "Forty-third Chapter of Job, A Masque of Reason".
7) a modern adaptation of historical dance (in the film Elizabeth) in which the dance consultant, drawing freely on authentic sources to realize the director's interpretation, actually showed an unpedantic theatrical professionalism that perhaps had its roots in the Stuart masque.
Ravelhofer finds firmer ground with costumes, because even though the material evidence has vanished, for the diligent scholar numerous records remain to provide a wealth of information about masque costuming.
La curiosite que peut susciter notre etude reside dans la maniere de considerer le masque : en effet, si celui-ci est pris comme un simple objet d'art destine a des decorations de salons ou a des expositions en musee, il y a evidemment a se demander comment le masque peut etre analyse comme une institution.
In some sense, the performative genre referred to as the Stuart masque functioned as such a tribute, expressed by means of all the creative disciplines that were at its makers' disposal.
Planned for the first quarter of this year is an extension of the Masque Bar line with new masks featuring peel-off and foil sheet masks in gold, silver and rose gold.
Products currently available in the line include: Three Tulasara[TM] Concentrates: Firm, Calm Brighten; Radiant Oleation Oil and Radiant Facial Dry Brush; and Wedding Masque Overnight and Wedding Masque Eye Overnight.
ISLAMABAD -- Faisal Masque is losing its charm gradually due to lack of proper maintenance and repair as gap between the broken titles, dust on the floor, malfunctioning fountain and lack of basic facilities create a nuisance for the visitors.