masochism

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Related to masochistically: two-fold

masochism

 [mas´o-kizm]
the act or instance of gaining pleasure experiencing physical or psychological pain. The term is usually used to denote sexual m. adj., adj masochis´tic.
sexual masochism a paraphilia in which sexual gratification is derived from being hurt, humiliated, or otherwise made to suffer physically or psychologically.

mas·och·ism

(mas'ō-kizm, maz'ō-),
1. Passive algolagnia; a form of perversion, often sexual in nature, in which a person experiences pleasure in being abused, humiliated, or maltreated. Compare: sadism.
2. A general orientation in life that personal suffering relieves guilt and leads to a reward.
[Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, Austro-Hungarian novelist, 1836-1895]

masochism

/maso·chism/ (mas´ah-kizm) the act or instance of gaining pleasure from physical or psychological pain; usually used to denote sexual masochism. masochis´tic
sexual masochism  a paraphilia in which sexual gratification is derived from being hurt, humiliated, or otherwise made to suffer physically or psychologically.

masochism

(măs′ə-kĭz′əm)
n.
1. The deriving of sexual gratification from fantasies or acts that involve being made to suffer physical or mental pain. Also called sexual masochism.
2. The deriving of pleasure from being humiliated or mistreated, either by another or by oneself.
3. A willingness or tendency to subject oneself to unpleasant or trying experiences.

mas′och·ist n.
mas′och·is′tic adj.
mas′och·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

masochism

[mas′ōkiz′əm]
Etymology: Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, Austrian author, 1836-1895
pleasure or gratification derived from receiving physical, mental, or emotional abuse. The maltreatment may be inflicted by another person or by oneself. It may involve a need to experience emotional or physical pain, in reality or fantasy, to become sexually aroused. Also called passive algolagnia. Compare sadism. See also algolagnia, sadomasochism. masochistic, adj.
Psychology Moral masochism A pattern of behaviour in which a person craves abuse and exploitation by others, possibly linked to unresolved childhood conflicts and a low self-esteem
Sexology Pleasure derived from physical or psychological pain inflicted on one’s self either by one’s self or by others. It is termed sexual masochism and classified as a paraphilia when it is consciously sought as a central part of one’s sexuoerotic scripts, acts or fantasies, or as a prerequisite to sexual arousal or gratification. In sexual masochism, the masochist is the recipient of abuse, torture, punishment, discipline, humiliation, and servitude; it is the opposite of sadism; both may coexist in the same person

masochism

Psychiatry A paraphilia/sexual deviancy in which there is a need–or preference for humiliation, physical abuse, or other form of suffering in order to achieve sexual arousal or orgasm. Cf Paraphilia, Sadism Psychology Moral masochism A pattern of behavior in which a person tolerates abuse and exploitation by others, possibly linked to unresolved childhood conflicts and a low self-esteem. See Self-esteem.

mas·och·ism

(mas'ŏ-kizm)
1. Passive algolagnia; a form of perversion, often sexual in nature, in which a person experiences pleasure in being abused, humiliated, or maltreated.
Compare: sadism
2. A general orientation in life that personal suffering relieves guilt and leads to a reward.
[Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, Austro-Hungarian novelist, 1836-1895]

masochism

The achievement of sexual arousal or gratification by the experience of physical or mental pain or humiliation. Masochism is said to derive from a partly repressed sense of guilt which inhibits orgasm but which can be assuaged by punishment so that orgasm becomes possible. (Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, 1835–95, Austrian pornographic novelist).

Masochism

Sexual arousal by having pain and/or humiliation inflicted upon oneself.
Mentioned in: Sexual Perversions

Sacher-Masoch,

Leopold von, Austrian attorney and writer, 1836-1895.
masochism - a form of perversion in which a person experiences pleasure in being abused, humiliated, or mistreated.
masochist - the passive party in the practice of masochism.
References in periodicals archive ?
could not help Helen, who had remained masochistically attached to mother, feeling strongly deprived by her, with vengeful, self-destructive wishes predominating.
Phallic fantasy also embodies the thrill of power, but here it is power either masochistically or sadistically experienced.
And her slavery to such form grotesquely continues even after her death: still complying, masochistically, with the dictates of their role, she and other deceased women regularly come out of their tombs at night to polish their headstones and to exchange cleaning tips.
During the opening scenes of Monkey Shines, Allan engaged in a masochistically punitive system of training.
There must be something about leaving it perilously late in vital European Champions' League matches that masochistically appeals to English sides.
Although he sometimes reveals himself swooning in a apparent loss of control, masochistically waiting and enduring, weeping and hoping, in the end he asserts his power.
Things have been tough for all four Welsh regions with a masochistically tough festive fixture programme, great for fans, bad for players, and no-one has suffered more than the Ospreys who were playing their fourth Magners League game in 14 days.
instinctually strives to be, regressively, masochistically, namely, to
You can't really understand precisely how this morally bankrupt, commercially craven, masochistically colonialist footage seals the glory of those four people whose snapshot Debord had explored so delicately years before--but you may understand that you don't get the joke because there is none.
I am proposing that liberal criticism not only seeks to regulate this excess but also acts it out masochistically at the level of a wounded and guilt-ridden identification with democratic state ideals.
But I can't think of a company in history that has gone out of its way, almost so masochistically, to identify what went wrong, to put procedures, new policies and new people in place to ensure it cannot happen again.
8) This would be, in particular, the mother of her two most terrible realizations: that of 'Homesickness' where, like the "black-winged angel" of the Magritte painting which this poem tacitly evokes, she "turns away', making no concession whatever to the diagnosis of the father's terminal cancer; and that of "They that Wash on Thursday', where the word "hand' hammers itself into itself in an almost manically, masochistically extended performance of the possibilities of identical rhyme: