masking


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Related to masking: Sound masking

mask·ing

(mask'ing),
1. The use of noise of any kind to interfere with the audibility of another sound. For any given intensity, low-pitched tones have a greater masking effect than those of a high pitch.
2. In audiology, the use of a noise applied to one ear while testing the hearing of the other ear.
3. The hiding of smaller rhythms in the brain wave record by larger and slower ones, the waveform of which they distort.
4. In dentistry, an opaque covering used to camouflage the metal parts of a prosthesis.
5. In radiography, superimposition of an altered positive image on the original negative to produce an enhanced copy photographically.

masking

(măs′kĭng)
n.
Physiology The concealment or screening of one sensory process or sensation by another.

masking

1 the covering or concealing of a disorder by a second condition. An example is a person's beginning a weight-loss diet while an undiagnosed wasting disease such as cancer has developed. The loss of body weight is attributed to the diet, masking the disease and delaying diagnosis and treatment.
2 the unconscious display of a personality trait that conceals a behavioral aberration.

masking

Evidence-based medicine
See Blinding.

Structural biology
Filtering, see there.

mask·ing

(mask'ing)
1. The use of noise of any kind to interfere with the audibility of another sound. For any given intensity, low-pitched tones have a greater masking effect than those of a high pitch.
2. audiology Application of a noise to one ear while testing the hearing acuity of the other ear.
3. The hiding of smaller rhythms in the brain wave record by larger and slower ones the wave form of which they distort.
4. dentistry An opaque covering used to camouflage the metal parts of a prosthesis.
5. radiography Superimposition of an altered positive image on the original negative to produce an enhanced copy photographically.

masking

A term describing any process whereby a detectable stimulus is made difficult or impossible to detect by the presentation of a second stimulus (called the mask). The main stimulus (typically called the target) may appear at the same time as the mask (simultaneous masking); or it may precede the mask (backward masking; example: metacontrast); or it may follow the mask (forward masking; example: paracontrast).

mask·ing

(mask'ing)
1. In dentistry, an opaque covering used to camouflage the metal parts of a prosthesis.
2. In radiography, superimposition of an altered positive image on the original negative to produce an enhanced copy photographically.

masking

1. using a mask for administering a gaseous anesthetic.
2. covering part of an x-ray film, usually with lead, while the other part is being exposed.
3. see blinding.

masking down
the use of a mask for inducing general anesthesia, using a gaseous anesthetic, followed by intubation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The following two experiments were aimed at evaluating the effects of backward masking on the discrimination of the expression and gender of faces.
In masking trials, masks were programmed so that each target face was followed an equal number of times by a mask of the same or the other gender.
Figure 2 (left panel) shows the proportion of correct identifications of expressions as a function of the target exposure times and for the three masking conditions: face-mask (samples of 8 x 8 pixels), no-mask, and noise-mask (scrambled samples of the face masks).
A 5 (Duration) x 3 (Mask) repeated measures ANOVA with Target Duration and Masking condition as factors gave significant main effects of Duration, F (4, 44) = 36.
Figure 2 (right panel) shows the results of the gender task under all three masking conditions.
Effects of backward masking on expression and gender identification were observed in Experiments 1a and 1b at different target durations.
No evidence of masking was obtained in this task at the two longest durations of 85 and 119 ms.
The effective masking produced by the noise mask with the shortest target duration suggests that interference of visual processing can be produced at very early stages, when the low-level properties of the face image are being processed.
If masking interferes specifically with face processing mechanisms, masks that preserve more facial information should be more interfering and thus should exert a stronger masking effect.
A clear effect of mask type is also observed, with more effective masking being produced by masks with higher sampling sizes.