masculinity


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masculinity

 [mas″ku-lin´ĭ-te]
the possession of masculine qualities.

mas·cu·lin·i·ty

(mas'kyū-lin'i-tē),
Male qualities and characteristics.

masculinity

/mas·cu·lin·i·ty/ (mas″ku-lin´ĭ-te) virility; the possession of masculine qualities.

masculinity

The quality or state of being masculine.

mas·cu·lin·i·ty

(mas'kyū-lin'i-tē)
The qualities and characteristics of a male.

masculinity

the possession of masculine qualities.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the 1990's I was invited to join discussions in Unesco about masculinity, gender and violence at a societal level.
Yet despite the differences in vantage point, both perspectives project similarly negative images of Afro-Brazilian heterosexual masculinity.
Mercer says gay pom today also reflects a "saturated" masculinity, so broadly defined and conceived that it can mean "many things, some of them contradictory in nature.
Raewyn Connell argued that "when looking at masculinity it is essential to be aware of the many masculinities in circulation" (in Moss, 2011, p.
Marketers have to figure out how to alleviate concerns about masculinity as they try to convince men to buy products that could be perceived as feminine, such as skin care products," concludes Monin.
In that case then, masculinity can possibly be taken away and it would not take long before a boy or a man who fails to be strong cannot be perceived as a man anymore.
While Shary writes that he "made a dedicated effort to bring forth such analyses [of masculinity and race] .
It is important to establish that masculinity is not reduced to the male body and that women can also perform masculinity (Halberstam 1998).
Focusing on wartime propaganda and military draft debates, part two discusses how the war redefined masculinity and the increasing power of the government to define and impact copper men's masculinity, as the Anaconda Copper Company (ACM) and the government turned to female, nonwhite, aged, or disabled persons to fill labour shortages within the copper industry.
Men in Western-dominated societies are invariably exposed to discourses of masculinity (Connell, 2005), which are defined as scripts that are evaluated culturally and that present ways of living to men, in a particular society and historical time (Neugarten, 1965, 1979; Nye, 2005).
While these traits were used to define historical tropes of Australian masculinity, an examination is necessary to determine whether they continue to hold currency in contemporary representations of Australian men.
Throughout the period, members of the proletariat challenged European notions of masculinity as "decadent," "self-serving," or "effeminate" (42).