masculinize

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Related to masculinised: masculinizes

masculinize

 [mas´ku-lĭ-nīz]
to produce normal secondary sex characters in a male.
to produce male secondary sex characters in a female.

mas·cu·li·nize

(mas'kyū-li-nīz'),
To confer the qualities or characteristics peculiar to the male.

masculinize

(măs′kyə-lə-nīz′)
tr.v. masculin·ized, masculin·izing, masculin·izes
1. To cause to have qualities that are perceived as masculine: a work environment that is masculinized.
2. To cause (a female) to assume masculine characteristics, as through the influence of hormones.

mas′cu·lin·i·za′tion (-lə-nĭ-zā′shən) n.

mas·cu·li·nize

(mas'kyū-li-nīz)
To confer the qualities or characteristics peculiar to the male.

masculinize

to produce masculine qualities in the female or in the sexually maturing male.
References in periodicals archive ?
That particular masculinised model, reflected in traditional Enlightenment notions of both self-contained men and nation, reiterates a patriarchal paradigm in which they each sustain themselves through domination of usually feminised others.
These actions alone do not negate the possibility of re-instating and re-affirming traditional masculinised identity, often murderous in its rejection of the feminine.
In some respects the men also identified their mothers as having to take on a similar viewpoint to placate the fathers' masculinised stance.
On top of this they must then attempt to position themselves in a cultural and family heritage that is highly masculinised, whereby the father is perceived as the dominant figure.
The problem is trying to have a body image that simultaneously fits into the gay culture, the Australian heterosexual culture, and their Asian masculinised culture.
Numerous researchers (Connell, 1990; Klein, 1993; Messner, 1992) have gained significant insights into the underpinning issues surrounding sport and masculine hegemony by carrying out extensive qualitative research on men involved in masculinised sporting subcultures.
These sports were selected because they are widely regarded as being masculinised activities in Western society, and as a consequence, men dominate them in terms of participation rates.