masculine protest


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mas·cu·line pro·test

(mas'kyū-lin prō'test),
Adler term to describe the movement of people from passive to active roles in a desire to escape from the feminine role.

masculine protest

Alfred Adler’s term for a woman’s striving to escape identification with a social feminine role, by adopting a traditionally masculine role of power in the workplace and in the home. The term masculine protest has been extended to mean the power struggle that compensates for an inferiority complex.
References in periodicals archive ?
The masculine protest that leads to fight club, like all forms of social critique, produces insiders and outsiders; those in the know, and those in the dark.
The dominant critique of mass society--so powerfully articulated by William Whyte and his brethren in the 1950s and David Fincher in 1999--is a form of masculine protest against the threatened erosion of gender difference.
Opting for masculine protest over any other form of social critique, Whyte makes it clear that the primary problem with the Organization is that it threatens to make men more like women: weak, dependent, focused on the collective instead of the individual, willing to please at all costs, focused on getting along rather than getting ahead.