marrow stimulation technique

marrow stimulation technique

Any technique used to treat cartilaginous injuries of the femur.
 
Examples
Abrasion arthroplasty, microfracturing, drilling.
 
Principle
Subchondral bone is penetrated to form a blood clot that will (ideally) lead to fibrous repair tissue.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Tom Minas reported the findings of a study that compared the results of ACI following a marrow stimulation technique versus no significant treatment (including simple debridement) performed on the same cartilage defect.
The data show that in this patient population marrow stimulation techniques like microfracture are not benign and can compromise a patient's ability to benefit from a subsequent treatment with ACI, effectively limiting their future treatment options," said Tom Minas, MD, an internationally renowned orthopaedic surgeon for his extensive work in the field of Cartilage Repair and principal investigator in this study.
Seven patients in the marrow stimulation technique group were deemed treatment failures.
At 3-5 years after surgery, patients who underwent autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) had significantly fewer symptoms, greater functional improvement, and a lower treatment failure rate than subjects who underwent marrow stimulation techniques, Dr.
With the exception of internal fixation, these procedures are collectively considered marrow stimulation techniques and are usually the first line of surgical treatment.
In general, most investigators recommend marrow stimulation techniques for lesions up to 1.
In separate podium presentations, surgeons described the five-year results of the first 100 patients treated with Carticel to repair damaged cartilage on the thigh-bone part of the knee; the potential of Carticel in treating injuries to the trochlea, a specific area of the femur beneath the knee cap; and the results of Carticel compared with so-called marrow stimulation techniques, an alternative treatment for some cartilage injuries.
Anderson of the Tennessee Orthopaedic Alliance/Lipscomb Clinic in Nashville compared the success of Carticel with that of so-called marrow stimulation techniques, such as abrasion arthoplasty, microfracture, and drilling, which are alternative techniques used to treat cartilage injuries to the femur.