market

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Related to markets: Stock markets, Financial markets

market

A popular term for the number of potential consumers of a product or service, which is defined by geography, industry, demographics or other means of commonality.
References in classic literature ?
It crossed Pigling's mind that if HE had asked for a lift, too, he might still have been in time for market.
10) The Board has reviewed carefully the competitive effects of the proposal in each of these banking markets in light of all the facts of record.
13) Both the San Diego and the Las Cruces banking markets would remain moderately concentrated as measured by the HHI.
Market research then begins all the studies required to ensure its feasibility in the identified markets, its correct price positioning, package testing, brand testing, formulation acceptance, etc.
On their Web site, they invited participants to suggest additional topics for markets and speculated that those suggestions might include terrorist attacks and political assassinations.
Despite the decline, the nation's single-family housing markets remained stable; however, it appears as if the trend toward increasing softness and reduced appreciation rates in some areas is growing.
The complaint alleged that the merger would have created unprecedented vertical and horizontal concentration in the defense industry, which substantially would have lessened, and in several cases eliminated, competition in major product markets critical to the national defense.
You can also control marketing expenses because you will not be marketing to outdated target markets or offering programs that people do not want.
It involves taking the millions of Soros or his clients, borrowing even more, and then making enormous bets on the direction of stock, bond, and currency markets worldwide.
the analysis, planning, implementation, and control of carefully formulated programs designed to bring about voluntary exchanges of values with target markets for the purpose of achieving organizational objectives.
As the industry became more competitive and attrition began to escalate while overall demand in some materials (like gray iron) declined, a new approach was clearly needed: identifying and aiming sales efforts toward "target" markets.