marker

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marker

 [mahr´ker]
something that identifies or that is used to identify; see also determinant.
cell-surface marker an antigenic determinant found on the surface of a specific type of cell.
tumor marker a biochemical substance indicative of presence of a tumor; ideally, it should be specific, sensitive, and proportional to tumor load. Called also biomarker.

mark·er

(mark'ĕr),
1. A device used to make a mark or to indicate measurement.
2. A characteristic or factor by which a cell or molecule can be recognized or identified.
3. A locus containing two or more alleles that, being harmless, are common and therefore yield high frequencies of heterozygotes, that facilitate linkage analysis.

marker

/mark·er/ (mahrk´er) something that identifies or that is used to identify.
tumor marker  a biochemical substance indicative of neoplasia, ideally specific, sensitive, and proportional to tumor load.

marker

(mär′kər)
n.
1. A biomarker.
2. A genetic marker.

marker

Medspeak
A value or indicator of the presence of a disease.

Molecular biology
An identifiable physical location on a chromosome (e.g., restriction enzyme cutting site, gene, minisatellite, microsatellite), the inheritance of which can be monitored. Markers can be an expressed region of DNA (gene encoding a protein) or a segment of DNA with no known coding function but whose pattern of inheritance can be determined. A marker can be localised to a specific region of the genome (e.g., all markers on the human transcript map are STSs).

Markers have also been defined as a genetic trait, of which one allelic form is selected or screened for after recombination. 

Suicidology
A potential physiologic indicator or predictor of an increased risk of suicide, the most promising of which is a decrease in serotonin in the brain.

marker

Internal medicine A diagnostic indicator for presence of a disease. See Biomarker, Bone marker, Breast marker, Cardiac marker, Cell marker, Cell surface marker, Gene marker, Genetic marker, Kinesic marker, Microsatellite marker, Pan B-cell marker, Pan T-cell marker, Selectable marker, Selected marker, Surface marker, Surrogate marker, Tumor marker.

mark·er

(mahrk'ĕr)
1. A device used to make a mark or to indicate measurement.
2. A characteristic or factor by which a cell or molecule can be recognized or identified.
3. A locus containing two or more alleles that, being harmless, are common and therefore yield high frequencies of heterozygotes that facilitate linkage analysis.

marker

1. A trait, condition, gene, or substance that indicates the presence of, or a probable increased predisposition to, a medical or psychological disorder.
2. A gene whose location on a chromosome is known so that it can be used as a point of reference for MAPPING new mutations.

marker

see GENETIC MARKER.

mark·er

(mahrk'ĕr)
1. A device used to make a mark or to indicate measurement.
2. A locus containing two or more alleles that, being harmless, are common and therefore yield high frequencies of heterozygotes, which facilitate linkage analysis

marker

a visual or electronic signal that permits identification and therefore sorting of individual items from a group.

marker animals
males or teasers wearing chin-ball or siresine harness so that females mounted are marked by crayon or paint.
marker genes
genes with a known location on a chromosome and an obvious phenotype which are used as reference points when mapping other genes.
histochemical marker
marking of cells or tissues based on a chemical identification of the contents; the location of specific chemical substances in particular locations is marked by the installation of an electronic or color signal.

Patient discussion about marker

Q. what is a safe tumor marker number range?

A. depends on the marker...most of the markers are materials that found normally in our body. and there are a number of markers and their levels differentiate. what marker do you mean?

Q. My wife(53) has elevated CEA and CA19.9 levels - near 150, without any concomitant reason/observation? Comment

A. Hi Bobby3,

The most important question is why were these tests done?
An elevated level may result from many causes, some of them are simple and some are more problematic. IMHO the best thing would be consulting her doctor to consider the need to check-up her alimentary system.
You can read more here (http://www.ascocancerfoundation.org/patient/ASCO+Resources/Patient+Guides/ASCO+Patient+Guide:+Tumor+Markers+for+Gastrointestinal+Cancers) and here (http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Detection/tumor-markers)

More discussions about marker
References in periodicals archive ?
Because the assay is based on endogenous gene expression, an arbitrary number of marker genes could, in principle, be included in the assay; the marker genes used in this study could be replaced by other estrogen-responsive genes such as the progesterone receptor.
1998), that grow even though they have not integrated the marker gene.
His cah marker gene enables callus - clumps of plant tissue - grown in petri dishes to convert cyanamide into urea fertilizer.
The Cah gene has possible whole plant benefits which are not conferred by other selectable marker genes.
C, apiculus color; Rc, red pericarp; + and - denote dominant and recessive of marker gene, respectively.
The Ubiquitin-1 promoter enhances feedback by boosting the effectiveness of reporter and marker genes.
The segregation ratios for the marker genes on chromosome 3 and on chromosome 6 were distorted, probably because of gametic lethal genes (Lin et al.
OAKLAND, CA--(BUSINESS WIRE)--August 14, 1995--DNA Plant Technology Corporation (NASDAQ: DNAP) and Monsanto Company (N-MTC) have agreed to settle legal action relating to two Monsanto patents, one concerning promoters and the other concerning marker genes.
OAKLAND, CA--(BUSINESS WIRE)--May 5, 1995--DNA Plant Technology Corporation (NASDAQ: DNAP) announced today that they have learned that DNAP was named in a complaint filed yesterday by Monsanto Company in the United States District Court, District of Delaware alleging infringement of two Monsanto patents, one concerning promoters and the other concerning marker genes.
Dunbar's studies indicate that marker genes incorporated into hematopoietic stem cells persist in their expression over time and may offer a technique for correcting immunologic disorders and treating cancer.
In the present study we identified the hyperparasitoid from the cotton mealybug and sequenced two marker genes, the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) and the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1), and developed and applied PCR primers for hyperparasitism detection in mealybug host using PCR.