marker

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marker

 [mahr´ker]
something that identifies or that is used to identify; see also determinant.
cell-surface marker an antigenic determinant found on the surface of a specific type of cell.
tumor marker a biochemical substance indicative of presence of a tumor; ideally, it should be specific, sensitive, and proportional to tumor load. Called also biomarker.

mark·er

(mark'ĕr),
1. A device used to make a mark or to indicate measurement.
2. A characteristic or factor by which a cell or molecule can be recognized or identified.
3. A locus containing two or more alleles that, being harmless, are common and therefore yield high frequencies of heterozygotes, that facilitate linkage analysis.

marker

/mark·er/ (mahrk´er) something that identifies or that is used to identify.
tumor marker  a biochemical substance indicative of neoplasia, ideally specific, sensitive, and proportional to tumor load.

marker

(mär′kər)
n.
1. A biomarker.
2. A genetic marker.

marker

Medspeak
A value or indicator of the presence of a disease.

Molecular biology
An identifiable physical location on a chromosome (e.g., restriction enzyme cutting site, gene, minisatellite, microsatellite), the inheritance of which can be monitored. Markers can be an expressed region of DNA (gene encoding a protein) or a segment of DNA with no known coding function but whose pattern of inheritance can be determined. A marker can be localised to a specific region of the genome (e.g., all markers on the human transcript map are STSs).

Markers have also been defined as a genetic trait, of which one allelic form is selected or screened for after recombination. 

Suicidology
A potential physiologic indicator or predictor of an increased risk of suicide, the most promising of which is a decrease in serotonin in the brain.

marker

Internal medicine A diagnostic indicator for presence of a disease. See Biomarker, Bone marker, Breast marker, Cardiac marker, Cell marker, Cell surface marker, Gene marker, Genetic marker, Kinesic marker, Microsatellite marker, Pan B-cell marker, Pan T-cell marker, Selectable marker, Selected marker, Surface marker, Surrogate marker, Tumor marker.

mark·er

(mahrk'ĕr)
1. A device used to make a mark or to indicate measurement.
2. A characteristic or factor by which a cell or molecule can be recognized or identified.
3. A locus containing two or more alleles that, being harmless, are common and therefore yield high frequencies of heterozygotes that facilitate linkage analysis.

marker

1. A trait, condition, gene, or substance that indicates the presence of, or a probable increased predisposition to, a medical or psychological disorder.
2. A gene whose location on a chromosome is known so that it can be used as a point of reference for MAPPING new mutations.

marker

see GENETIC MARKER.

mark·er

(mahrk'ĕr)
1. A device used to make a mark or to indicate measurement.
2. A locus containing two or more alleles that, being harmless, are common and therefore yield high frequencies of heterozygotes, which facilitate linkage analysis

marker

a visual or electronic signal that permits identification and therefore sorting of individual items from a group.

marker animals
males or teasers wearing chin-ball or siresine harness so that females mounted are marked by crayon or paint.
marker genes
genes with a known location on a chromosome and an obvious phenotype which are used as reference points when mapping other genes.
histochemical marker
marking of cells or tissues based on a chemical identification of the contents; the location of specific chemical substances in particular locations is marked by the installation of an electronic or color signal.

Patient discussion about marker

Q. what is a safe tumor marker number range?

A. depends on the marker...most of the markers are materials that found normally in our body. and there are a number of markers and their levels differentiate. what marker do you mean?

Q. My wife(53) has elevated CEA and CA19.9 levels - near 150, without any concomitant reason/observation? Comment

A. Hi Bobby3,

The most important question is why were these tests done?
An elevated level may result from many causes, some of them are simple and some are more problematic. IMHO the best thing would be consulting her doctor to consider the need to check-up her alimentary system.
You can read more here (http://www.ascocancerfoundation.org/patient/ASCO+Resources/Patient+Guides/ASCO+Patient+Guide:+Tumor+Markers+for+Gastrointestinal+Cancers) and here (http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Detection/tumor-markers)

More discussions about marker
References in periodicals archive ?
The other two plasmids received in both injections were marker genes rol-6(su1006) and GFP.
It is possible to remove the marker genes before the plant is released but critics claim these precautions are rarely taken.
Hashsham's device will be designed to look for such marker genes.
DNA sequencing will keep its central role for detailed characterization of bacterial marker genes in systematic microbiology.
The first consists of producing marker-free plants whereby the selectable marker is removed by a variety of methods, including site-specific recombination, transposon-mediated elimination and cotransformation followed by segregation but such methods are either more difficult to implement or are less efficient than procedures that leave the marker genes in the plant (Day, 2003; Miki and McHugh, 2004).
The invention of oriSELECT puts RecipharmCobra in the unique position of owning the only two plasmid maintenance systems, including ORT (Operator-Repressor Titration), that are free of the burden of expressed selectable marker genes.
The mRNA expression levels of all the three marker genes were found to be up-regulated by both neoeriocitrin and naringin at the concentration of 2 [micro]g/ml (Fig.
The resulting CPCs were similar to cardiac progenitors in appearance, colony formation, activation of cardiac marker genes and cardiac lineage differentiation potential," he said.
The assumption that the patient strain had low pathogenicity was further corroborated by the analysis of additional marker genes (6-9) indicating the lack of pathogenicity islands associated with high virulence of STEC in humans.
Their topics include functional genomics analysis of key bacterial traits involved in rhizosphere competence during microbial-host interactions, screening phylogenetic and functional marker genes in soil microbial ecology, soil metatranscriptomics, soil volatile organic compounds as tracers for microbial activities in soils, and classical techniques versus omics approaches.
These cells, which we designated iPS (induced pluripotent stem) cells, exhibit the morphology and growth properties of ES cells and express ES cell marker genes.
Cell doubling time and relative expression of differentiation marker genes were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance test or Student's t test (JMP[R] 6.