marginal ridge


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Related to marginal ridge: Oblique ridge, triangular ridge, transverse ridge

mar·gi·nal ridge

[TA]
the rounded borders that form the mesial and distal margins of the occlusal surface of a tooth.

marginal ridge

an elevation of enamel that forms the proximal boundary of the occlusal surface of a tooth.

mar·gi·nal ridge

(mahr'ji-năl rij) [TA]
1. An elevation of enamel that forms the proximal boundaries of the occlusal surface of premolars and molars.
2. An elevation on the mesial and distal portions of the lingual surface and, occasionally, the labial surface of incisors.

mar·gi·nal ridge

(mahr'ji-năl rij) [TA]
Rounded edges of a tooth where the occlusal surface meets the mesial or distal surfaces and forms a ridge or crest.
Synonym(s): marginal crest of tooth [TA] , crista marginalis dentis.

marginal ridge,

n See ridge, marginal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Extrusion is associated with discrepancy in marginal ridge relationship.
Iatrogenic hazards--grinding and carving of marginal ridge on severely worn attrited tooth may increase chances of pulp exposure, causing iatrogenic damage.
ii) Consider the slope of the marginal ridge (external, internal) while restoring discrepancy in the marginal ridge relationship.
2007a] and particularly so when more than half the marginal ridge of the tooth had been lost.
Scenario Description of Case Scenario One (NA) A 5-year-old female patient presents Five (DA) with a mesio-occlusal cavity in tooth 85 resulting in loss of less than half the marginal ridge.
The second most common reason was noted to be a failure was due to inadequate resistance form followed by fracture whether isthmus, bulk or marginal ridge fracture.
This result implies that in FMT, what is important is preserving the marginal ridge, such that in 2-surface cavities, in which fracture strength is significantly higher than 3-surface cavities, the thickness of cavity walls does not play a significant role in increasing fracture strength, but in 3-surface cavities with loss of both marginal ridges, preserving more thickness in cavity walls can result in a significant increase to fracture.
Comparing this result between first and second molars implies that loss of the marginal ridge in the latter is less important than the former.
Preserving the marginal ridge in first primary molars was especially important for increasing tooth strength.
Clinically, the COS is measured by placing a flat plane touching the incisal edges anteriorly and distal marginal ridges of the most posterior teeth.