marauding


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marauding

A poetic (i.e., non-medical) term for raiding, looting, plundering, taking by force.
References in periodicals archive ?
The pope's posse inadvertently showed they can move at mach speed to save marriage from marauding gays but glacial speed when it comes to saving children from molesting priests.
The last chapter, "Separate Creations," is the only one to put Euroamericans at the center of the story as the marauding Paxton Boys, various diplomats at the Treaty of Paris (1783), Thomas Jefferson, and Andrew Jackson all envisioned a world empty of an Indian presence.
Di Giorgio Martini's fortress walls splay outwards, down to the sea to repel marauding buccaneers.
If you choose to be an evil tyrant and amuse yourself by wreaking havoc on the people with lightning storms and decimate them with marauding creatures, you will rule by tear.
Tonala already was a teeming market center generations before Beltran Nuno de Guzman and his 300 marauding conquistadores arrived in the village on March 25, 1530.
The story is of Mezlekia's awakening consciousness, his early troubles at school (and the rites, memorably rendered, meant to exorcise his demons) and the terrible loss of both parents to the marauding forces--human hyenas--unleashed by the hysteria that followed the ouster of Emperor Haile Selassie in 1974.
In an earlier study, Andrew Sih, also of the University of Kentucky, found the reverse response--a hatching delay--in streamside salamander eggs exposed to chemical traces of predatory sunfish or marauding gangs of flatworms.
Adverse weather, delays in transport, insects, and marauding predators are some of the more well known factors that contribute to lost or poor quality game meat every hunting season.
some eight hours into the burning, looting, and youth-gone-wild marauding of Woodstock '99, an older state trooper turned to a group of bedraggled teenagers sitting near a coffee stand.
Of the five million people in the South, 2 1/2 million are at the point of starvation, a situation deliberately created by the Islamic marauding parties, who also kidnap children for sale in the North.
By moving to short-term leases and providing temporary rent relief to peasants in regions hit by crop failures and marauding soldiers, the Albrets proved themselves to be much more capable of adapting to both immediate crises and long-term trends than many earlier authors, notably Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie, had given absentee noble landowners credit for.