manure

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Related to manuring: crop rotation, Green Manuring

manure

the dung of farm animals used as replenishment for the ground.

manure disposal
has become a major problem to animal farming in urban areas. Methods have been devised to avoid labor involvement by the use of pits under animal accommodation, or by discharging onto pasture or into evaporative lagoons by use of a slurry pushed through a hose. Housing animals on litter and rapid composting of the litter has advantages.
manure management
includes collection, storage, fly and odor control, environmental pollution, avoiding soiling of cow's hair and udder, bedding supply and distribution, maintaining good footage.
manure pit gas poisoning
large quantities of hydrogen sulfide gas are produced in pits and tanks in which animal manure is undergoing biological degradation. If the contents of the pit are stirred violently to facilitate emptying, the gas may be released into the atmosphere in a high concentration, and if the area is enclosed, poisoning of animals and humans can occur.
References in periodicals archive ?
The results of this study showed that the highest biomass for green manuring using the two popular local cowpea varieties Drum(creeping type) and Oloyin (erect type) were 160,000 and 111,111 plants/ha, respectively.
For green manuring in maize production systems, 55,555 plants/ha of Oloyin and 80,000 plants/ha of Drum could therefore be recommended.
Overall, this book provides a valuable, albeit Eurocentric, perspective on ancient manuring and fertilisation.
From an archaeological perspective, the investigation of ancient manuring could well sit at the heart of university courses on environmental archaeology, especially those which aim to tackle questions of agricultural sustainability.
Higher plant vigour in organic manure and NPK fertilizer treatment plots than in no manuring treatment plots was a clear evidence of improved nutritional status of the soil as a result of appropriate doses of the treatment (soil amendments) in this study.
The combined effects of cultivar and manuring treatment on the yield varied among the cultivars.
Other, possibly more convincing, evidence for manuring in the Middle and Late Bronze Ages has been brought forward by J.
These are not the earliest indications of manuring known in the Netherlands.