manubrium


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Related to manubrium: manubrium of malleus, Body of sternum

manubrium

 [mah-noo´bre-um] (L.)
1. the uppermost portion of the sternum; called also manubrium sterni.
2. the largest process of the malleus, giving attachment to the tendon of the tensor muscle of the tympanum; called also manubrium mallei.

ma·nu·bri·um

, pl.

ma·nu·bri·a

(mă-nū'brē-ŭm, -ă), [TA]
The portion of the sternum or of the malleus that resembles the handle of a sword or hammer.
[L. handle]

manubrium

/ma·nu·bri·um/ (mah-noo´bre-um) pl. manu´bria   [L.] a handle-like structure or part, such as the manubrium of the sternum.
manubrium mal´lei , manubrium of malleus the longest process of the malleus; it is attached to the middle layer of the tympanic membrane and has the tensor tympani muscle attached to it.
manubrium ster´ni , manubrium of sternum the cranial part of the sternum, articulating with the clavicles and first two pairs of ribs.

manubrium

(mə-no͞o′brē-əm, -nyo͞o′-)
n. pl. manu·bria (-brē-ə)
A body part or process shaped like a handle, especially:
a. The broad upper division of the sternum with which the clavicle and first two ribs articulate. Also called episternum, presternum.
b. The long tapering process of the malleus attached to the central portion of the eardrum.

manubrium

[məno̅o̅′brē·əm]
Etymology: L, handle
the most anterior of the three bones of the sternum, presenting a broad quadrangular shape that narrows caudally at its articulation with the superior end of the body of the sternum. The pectoralis major and the sternocleidomastoideus are attached to the manubrium. Compare xiphoid process. manubrial, adj.

ma·nu·bri·um

, pl. manubria (mă-nū'brē-ŭm, -ă) [TA]
The portion of the sternum or of the malleus that represents the handle.
[L. handle]

manubrium

The shield-shaped upper part of the breastbone (STERNUM). The inner ends of the collar bones (clavicles) and of the first and second ribs articulate with the manubrium.

manubrium

  1. any handle-like elongated process.
  2. the tubular mouth of a jellyfish.
  3. the anterior segment of the sternum in mammals.
  4. the first segment of the springing organ in COLLEMBOLA.

manubrium

pl. manubria [L.]
1. the most cranial portion of the sternum.
2. the largest process of the malleus, giving attachment to the tendon of the tensor muscle of the tympanum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: FIGURE 6: Note that the basion plumb line which stands posterior to manubrium.
Tentacular contraction and oral-directed bending of the pedalium is consistent with the feeding behavior described by Larson (1976) in which shortening of the tentacle and inward bending of the pedalium allowed transfer of prey from the tentacle to the manubrium.
Out of the two SH, the medial fleshy head arose from the anterolateral surface of the manubrium sterni, while the lateral tendinous head was arising from the sternum close to sternoclavicular joint, and both fused with each other near its attachment to the mastoid process.
In the patients with posterior dislocations, the hooks were placed in an intraosseus position in the manubrium to prevent redisplacement posteriorly.
In some cases a bony spur is palpable on the mandible or a small cleft is felt on the manubrium sternum.
Manubrium sterni stress fracture: an unusual complication of non-contact sport.
On the anterior thoracic wall there is loss of soft tissue on the right side, from the union of the manubrium with the body of the sternum, continuing caudal-like and stemming from the sterna union with the second rib on the left side.
Other bones that may indicate ethnicity include (1) the sternum, which may show an opening that is frequently mistaken for a healed entry wound from a bullet in the lower aspect of the manubrium (African) (Figures 1 [IV B] and 10); (2) the femur, which shows an anteriorly oriented bowing (African); (3) greater bone density than typical (African); (4) femora with greater than typical curvature (Asian); and (5) considerable torsion at the femoral neck (Asian).
In figure-of-eight technique, a total of four figure-of-eight sutures were placed parasternally (one cephalically at the manubrium and three at the body of sternum).
Compression of the tracheal lumen to 3 mm in span was seen at the level of the manubrium (Figure 2).
On examination, there was intense redness, tenderness and swelling of the manubrium and the left sternoclavicular joint.
It took origin from the second costal cartilage to the manubrium of sternum and the second costochondral joint, afterwards became a tendinous structure and divided into two on the coracoid process.