manner

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Related to manners: Table manners

man·ner

(măn'ĕr)
The way in which something is done; style, method.
[O.Fr. maniere, fr. L. manus, hand]
References in classic literature ?
He must have all Edward's virtues, and his person and manners must ornament his goodness with every possible charm.
as illustrating manners, is still more curious than the King and the Hermit; but it is foreign to the present purpose.
As to the Senate, it is impossible that any regulation of "time and manner," which is all that is proposed to be submitted to the national government in respect to that body, can affect the spirit which will direct the choice of its members.
As she concluded, the young lady curtisied to the youth in a manner that contradicted, by its flattery, the forced irony of her remark.
Every now and then Monsieur raised his eyes to the ceiling, then lowered them towards the slices of pate which the chevalier was attacking, and finally, not caring to betray his resentment, he gesticulated in a manner which Harlequin might have envied.
One is apt, I believe, to connect assurance of manner with coquetry, and to expect that an impudent address will naturally attend an impudent mind; at least I was myself prepared for an improper degree of confidence in Lady Susan; but her countenance is absolutely sweet, and her voice and manner winningly mild.
There is something equivocal in all the words in use to express the excellence of manners and social cultivation, because the quantities are fluxional, and the last effect is assumed by the senses as the cause.
What chiefly struck me was the gentle manners of these people, and I longed to join them, but dared not.
A little disconcerted by this reception, Hugh looked from the secretary to Dennis, who had risen and was standing at the table too, observing the stranger by stealth, and seeming to derive the utmost satisfaction from his manners and appearance.
Martin looked as if he did not know what manner was.
But, in the composure of his manner he was unaltered, except that to the shrewd glance of Mr.
The author diverts the emperor, and his nobility of both sexes, in a very uncommon manner.