mangosteen

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mangosteen

A tropical fruit that grows on an evergreen tree Garcinia mangostana Linn., found in Indonesia and Indochina. Its hull has been used as a traditional medicine in Thailand. Extracts from the hull have antioxidant, antihistaminic, and anti-inflammatory effects in laboratory experiments.
References in periodicals archive ?
The United States has to import all their mangosteens, because the fruit is not able to grow commercially due to its challenging weather and soil requirements.
The market price for mangosteens has hovered around $35-$45 for a 10lb carton.
Mangosteen xanthones, [alpha]-and [gamma]-mangostins, inhibit allergic mediators in bone marrow-derived mast cell.
Mangosteens have been used in numerous anti-cancer studies, with positive results.
European explorers found the fragile mangosteen plant to be difficult to transport.
Anyone who has ever had the privilege of tasting the elusive mangosteen would understand why it is often called the most delicious fruit in the world.
The slow, growing mangosteen tree reaches a height of about 45 feet and does not bare fruit until it is around 15 years old.
Kings Super Markets here will feature tropical mangosteen fruit imported from Thailand, starting tomorrow.
The mangosteen is widely considered a "superfruit" with superior nutritional features.
According to legend, Queen Victoria offered knighthood to any subject who could bring her a mangosteen in prime condition.
For hundreds of years, people in Singapore, Malaysia, India, and China have been using the fruit and the bark of the mangosteen tree to treat diarrhea and eczema.
Mangosteens, also native to Malaysia, are about the size and shape of a small Fuyu persimmon when fresh with a thick, smooth, brownish purple, leathery hide.