manganese poisoning


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manganese

 (Mn) [mang´gah-nēs]
a chemical element, atomic number 25, atomic weight 54.938. (See Appendix 6.) Its salts occur in the body tissue in very small amounts and serve as activators of liver arginase and other enzymes.
manganese poisoning a condition usually caused by inhalation of manganese dust; symptoms of chronic exposure include mental disorders accompanying a syndrome resembling Parkinson's disease, and inflammation throughout the respiratory system.

manganese poisoning

Acute or chronic intoxication due to manganese excess.
 
Aetiology
Industrial exposure to manganese-laden fumes and dusts in mining, steel foundries, welding, and battery manufacture.
 
Clinical findings
Acute—pneumonitis; chronic—psychotic or schizophrenia-like episodes, parkinsonism, movement disorders.
 
Management
O2 administration, supportive care.

manganese poisoning

Acute or chronic intoxication due to manganese excess Etiology Industrial exposure to manganese-laden fumes and dusts in mining, steel foundries, welding, battery manufacture Clinical Acute–pneumonitis; chronic–psychotic or schizophrenia-like episodes, parkinsonism, movement disorders Management O2 administration, supportive. See Manganese.

manganese poisoning

An industrial disease largely confined to miners who breathe manganese ore dust and workers exposed to manganese compounds. Brain damage occurs, resulting in rigidity of the muscles with loss of facial expression, slowness of movement, speech impairment, and delusions, hallucinations and compulsive disorders.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although clinicians have attempted to chelate adults suffering from chronic occupational manganese poisoning, evidence for the effectiveness of chelation therapy in either reducing total body burdens of manganese or reversing symptoms of neurologic toxicity is lacking (27).
Manganese poisoning and the attack of trivalent manganese upon catecholamines.