mammoplasty


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Related to mammoplasty: Reduction mammoplasty

mammaplasty

 [mam´ah-plas″te]
plastic surgery of the breast; called also mammoplasty.
augmentation mammaplasty plastic surgery to increase the size of the female breast, or sometimes to uplift pendulous breasts. It can be done for purely cosmetic purposes, as when a woman wants larger breasts, or following mastectomy to replace surgically removed tissue (see reconstructive mammaplasty).
reconstructive mammaplasty breast reconstruction after mastectomy, done as an alternative to breast forms and specially designed brassieres to achieve a more normal appearance of the breast. If this procedure is chosen, it is usually considered to be just one stage in the total plan of treatment for breast cancer. It has both a psychologic and physiologic impact on the patient. Criteria used to determine whether reconstructive surgery is appropriate postmastectomy include the amount of tissue remaining after mastectomy, e.g., pectoral muscles, skin, and nipple; the probability of recurrent metastatic disease; appearance and size of the unoperated breast; and size and angle of the mastectomy scar. Adjuvant cancer therapy with radiation does not necessarily preclude additional plastic breast surgery.
reduction mammaplasty plastic surgery to reduce the size of the female breast. Physical and psychological problems that may be amenable to this include fatigue or a dragging sensation caused by the weight of the breasts, breast tenderness and discomfort, and difficulty obtaining adequate support even with a sturdy brassiere. Psychological stress can result from embarrassment over deep grooves created by the shoulder straps of brassieres, fear of ridicule, and difficulty in finding suitable clothing. Reduction mammaplasty usually involves removal of excess breast tissue by way of a curved incision under the breast. The skin is pulled taut and the nipple transplanted to its normal position in the center of the newly formed breast. After surgery the patient may need help in adjusting to a new body image. If she is of childbearing age she should be informed that normal lactation is no longer possible after this procedure.

mam·ma·plas·ty

(mam'ă-plas'tē),
Plastic surgery of the breast to alter its shape, size, or position, usually for cosmetic purposes, to correct congenital anomalies, relieve symptoms (that is, from macromastia), or correct deformities resulting from cancer, burns, or trauma.
Synonym(s): mammoplasty, mastoplasty
[L. mamma, breast, + G. plastos, formed]

mammoplasty

/mam·mo·plas·ty/ (mam´ah-plas″te) mammaplasty.

mammoplasty

or

mammaplasty

(măm′ə-plăs′tē)
n. pl. mammoplas·ties
Reconstructive or plastic surgery of the breast.

mammoplasty

[mam′əplas′tē]
Etymology: L, mamma + Gk, plassein, to mold
plastic reshaping of the breasts, performed to reduce or lift large or sagging breasts, to enlarge small breasts, or to reconstruct a breast after removal of a tumor. To reduce the size of the breasts and raise them, excess tissue is removed from the underside of the breasts. The breast is then lifted, and the nipple drawn through an opening in an overhanging skin flap. To enlarge a breast, a saline-filled or silicone gel prosthesis is inserted in a pocket formed beneath the breast on the chest wall. The complications after surgery are infection and, with the use of foreign body implants, rejection by tissues. The nurse observes the nipples for signs of vascular insufficiency or congestion, applies a firm supporting breast binder or brassiere, and instructs the patient to limit use of her arms to lift herself.

mammoplasty

Any form of cosmetic (plastic) surgery to the breast. Mammoplasty is performed because the breasts are perceived to be too small, sagging or too large, or require reconstruction after breast cancer.

mammoplasty

Surgery Any form of surgery to the breast. See Augmentation mammoplasty, Breast implants, Mastopexy, Reduction mammoplasty.

mam·ma·plas·ty

(mam'ă-plas-tē)
Surgical procedure of the breast to alter its shape, size, or position, or all in combination.
Synonym(s): mammoplasty, mastoplasty.
[L. mamma, breast, + G. plastos, formed]

mammoplasty

Plastic surgery on the breasts. Surgery to increase the bulk is called augmentation mammoplasty; surgery to make breasts smaller is called reduction mammoplasty. When breasts have been removed for cancer, breast reconstruction is possible.

Mammoplasty

Surgery performed to change the size of breasts.

mammoplasty

plastic surgery of the breast.
References in periodicals archive ?
Crikelair and Malton [4] published the first reported case of occult carcinoma discovered during reduction mammoplasty in 1959.
Correctly-fitted, supportive bras have been found to alleviate up to 85% of these problems, allowing females to exercise in greater comfort and potentially removing the need for breast reduction mammoplasty (Greenbaum et al 2003, Wilson and Sellwood 1976, Maha 2000).
amp;der M: Allergic contact dermatitis to terramycin after reduction mammoplasty.
CHICAGO -- Image-guided multicatheter brachytherapy produces excellent cosmesis and a low complication rate--including a minimal risk of capsular contracture--in women with early-stage breast carcinoma who have undergone mammoplasty augmentation, according to data presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.
Primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK), obtained from reduction mammoplasty (BioWhittaker, Walkersville, MD), were cultured in serum-free, low calcium (0.
Similarly, the use of pieces of adipose tissue and artificial tissue substitutes such as silicon, collagen and hydroxyapatite for soft tissue augmentation in facial hemiatrophy, hypomastia, mammoplasty and other deformities again face safety issues.
Histologically, healthy breast tissue from 9 reduction mammoplasty procedures was treated as the tumor biopsy specimens.
These "dicey" calls, where quality of life rather than life itself is the health indicator to be considered (reduction mammoplasty and electric wheelchairs are two common sources of such controversies, she notes), are "very troubling when they occur," she admits.