mammary glands


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

mammary glands

Etymology: L, mamma, breast, glans, acorn
lactiferous glands within the breasts. Glandular tissue forms a radius of lobes containing alveoli, each lobe having a system of ducts for the passage of milk from the alveoli to the nipple. The central part of the breast is filled with glandular tissue. Also called breast, mamma. See also lactation.

mammary glands

Compound glands of the female breast that can secrete milk. They are made up of lobes and lobules bound together by areolar tissue. The main ducts number 15 to 20 and are known as lactiferous ducts, each one discharging through a separate orifice upon the surface of the nipple. The dilatations of the ducts form reservoirs for the milk during lactation. The pink, or dark-colored, skin around the nipple is called the areola.
References in periodicals archive ?
001% of the mRNA abundance) in mammary glands might be due to the low protein yields encountered in the protein purification process (White et al.
Paris, a ten-year-old Chihuahua too came in to the hospital for a booster vaccination when doctors found a mass in her mammary gland.
Gartner's group plans to use the technique to investigate what cellular or structural changes in mammary glands can lead to the breakdown of tissue architecture associated with tumors that metastasize, invading other parts of the body and threatening the life of the patient.
Whole mounts of mammary glands harvested at PND50, PND90, PND140, and PND200 (n = 9-12/treatment/age/exposure group) were assessed for proliferative lesions.
The expression of intermediate filaments in canine mammary glands and their tumors.
The entire mammary glands and liver were removed, and the lipids extracted and saponified to measure the rates of fatty acid synthesis [9].
Topics include the comparative pathology of mammary gland cancers in domestic and wild animals, neoplasia in nonhuman primates, mouse models of breast cancer, comparison of genetically engineered mouse mammary cancer models and human breast cancer by expression profiling, genetically engineered rat models, chemical carcinogenesis of rat and mouse mammary glands, comparative genetics and genomes of rat models, toxicogenomic analyses of genetic susceptibility to mammary gland carcinogenesis in rodents and the applications for breast cancer, and the relationship between comparative medicine, "one medicine," and genomic pathology.
While the thyroid is known as the principal user of iodine in the body, recent biological research has discovered several organs that actively concentrate iodine including the stomach mucosa, mammary glands, salivary glands, thymus, choroid plexus, kidney, joints arteries, and bones, (1), (5) The lactating mammary gland and salivary glands concentrate iodine almost to the same degree as the thyroid gland does.
The hormone has long been known to cause milk to be let down from the mammary glands, but it is also involved in the enhancement of trust and love in humans and animals.
Previous studies have revealed that FoxA1 is expressed at high levels in differentiated luminal cells in mammary glands, suggesting that it may be a protein marker of these cells.
The breasts of Japanese women are generally different from those of Western women in that they often have more developed mammary glands.