malleus


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to malleus: Malleus Maleficarum

malleus

 [mal´e-us]
the outermost and largest of the three ossicles of the ear; called also hammer. See also color plates.

mal·le·us

, gen. and pl.

mal·le·i

(mal'ē-ŭs, mal'ē-ī), [TA]
The largest of the three auditory ossicles, resembling a club rather than a hammer; it is regarded as having a head, below which is the neck, and from this diverge the handle or manubrium, and the slender, anterior process; from the base of the manubrium the short lateral process arises. The manubrium and lateral process are firmly attached to the tympanic membrane, and the head articulates with a saddle-shaped surface on the body of the incus.
Synonym(s): hammer
[L. a hammer]

malleus

/mal·le·us/ (mal´e-us) [L.] the outermost of the auditory ossicles, and the one attached to the tympanic membrane; its club-shaped head articulates with the incus

malleus

(măl′ē-əs)
n. pl. mallei (măl′ē-ī′)
The hammer-shaped bone that is the outermost of the three small bones in the mammalian middle ear. Also called hammer.

malleus

[mal′ē·əs] pl. mallei
Etymology: L, hammer
one of the three ossicles in the middle ear, resembling a hammer with a head, neck, and three processes. It is connected to the tympanic membrane and transmits sound vibrations to the incus, which communicates with the stapes. Compare incus, stapes. See also middle ear.

malleus

A tiny hammer-shaped auditory ossicle that inserts at the inner face of the tympanic membrane and articulates with the incus, which, in turn, articulates with the stapes.

mal·le·us

, pl. mallei (mal'ē-ŭs, -ī) [TA]
The largest of the three auditory ossicles, resembling a club rather than a hammer; it is regarded as having a head, below which is the neck, and from this diverge the handle or manubrium, and the slender, anterior process; from the base of the manubrium the short lateral process arises. The manubrium and lateral process are firmly attached to the tympanic membrane, and the head articulates with a saddle-shaped surface on the body of the incus.
Synonym(s): hammer.
[L. a hammer]

malleus

The outermost and largest of three small bones of the middle ear, the auditory ossicles. From the Latin malleus, a hammer.

malleus

or

hammer

the hammer-shaped bone that is the outermost of the three ear ossicles.

Malleus

One of the three bones of the middle ear. It is also known as the "hammer."
Mentioned in: Stapedectomy

malleus

1. the largest of the three ossicles of the ear; called also hammer.
2. glanders.
References in periodicals archive ?
Paul Hickingbotham is technical director at Malleus and feels Binley is the perfect position from which to develop the company given the site's well-connected base and links with the university - as the firm aims to employ more technical staff.
Since both the early hominin species share this human-like malleus, the anatomical changes in this bone must have occurred very early in our evolutionary history.
By its stratigraphical position, this impoverished interval probably corresponds to the lower part of the Conochitina malleus Biozone in the uppermost Ikla Member (397.
For example, there is a long account in the Malleus Maleficarum of an attempted exorcism of a young Bohemian priest who thought himself demonically possessed.
Heinrich Kramer and James Springer, Malleus Maleficarum, trans.
WHERE in the human body would you find the Incus and Malleus bones?
Of particular interest to the team were bones found in the middle ear, especially one called the malleus.
They found the umbo - where the eardrum connects to the hammer or malleus - produced the greatest sound vibration, particularly if the incus or anvil bone first was removed surgically.
3 In the human body, which organ are the malleus, incus and stapes bones located?
This beautifully hand silk-screened Malleus cover, two-CD set is limited to a 1,000 copies with bonus DVD features of three videos and six soundscapes.
Focusing on less-studied works by Johannes Nider, Jean Vineti, Pico della Mirandola, Alonso Tostado, Bartolomeo Spina, and others, as well as the Malleus maleficarum, Stephens persuasively argues that the witch figure emerged after 1400 from a mixed bag of ideas about the activities of heretics, necromancers, and exorcists in the context of theological speculation about the possibilities of human contacts with demons.
The Malleus maleficarum and Ulrich Molitor's De lamiis et phitonicis mulieribus are focused upon as representative examples of contemporary witchcraft treatises.