malinger

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ma·lin·ger

(mă-ling'gĕr),
To engage in malingering.

ma·lin·ger

(mă-ling'gĕr)
To pretend to be ill or disabled, or to feign slow recuperation from an illness or other disabling condition, to arouse sympathy, avoid work or other responsibilities, or continue to receive medical care, medical benefits, or other forms of attention or compensation.
[Fr. malingre, fr. mal-, bad, + Old. Fr. haingre, heingre, thin, haggard]

malinger

(ma-ling'er) [Fr. malingre, weak, sickly]
To feign illness, usually to arouse sympathy, to escape work, or to continue to receive compensation.
See: factitious disorder; Munchausen syndrome
References in periodicals archive ?
Those who fail the test due to unemployment, ill health or disability are castigated as work shy malingerers.
The effect of unemployment on self esteem is well documented and by encouraging the portrayal of the unemployed as malingerers Ms Joan Burton has made a bad situation worse.
With the strain on government health facilities due to a high number of patients, often raised by the ministry, it's time they stood up and took a hard stance against persistent malingerers.
Advantages include systematic monitoring of employees, liaison with medical professionals and insurers, plus the accurate identifying of malingerers.
In fact, often these people were described as work-shy malingerers when the reality was that even the most dedicated job-seekers could not find jobs simply because they didn't exist.
Brady writes: "But perhaps more embarrassing to prudently financial New Labour, are the ranks of tramps and malingerers who have escaped into Ashworth to avoid working for a living, demanding and receiving full board and full benefits of pounds 100 per week pocket money for life (we prison transfers receive only pounds 25, being regarded as 'patients' only for restrictions).
Malingerers mislead doctors in order to acquire tangible gains, such as money and narcotics.
This is only compounded by malingerers who book themselves into the hospital hotel-style for the most petty of symptoms.
The current material now available on the subject of working with malingerers provides little information about successfully managing a helping relationship with such individuals (Kagle, 1998).
Experts believe soldiers underreport mental and emotional wounds for fear of being considered cowards or malingerers and suggest that the incidence of PTSD could rise in the months and years ahead.
The malingerers may come to realise the benefit of breaking down this small but significant barrier.
And doing it for the best part of a decade while a succession of makeweights, muppets, fakes on the make and malingerers have come and, mostly, gone.