majority language


Also found in: Encyclopedia.

majority language

(mă-jor′ĭt-ē)
The language spoken by most of the people living in a multilingual nation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Regardless of whether one is dominant in the majority language or prefers using English to Korean, most of the participants had positive attitudes toward maintaining or developing their HL.
Major outputs: A review (with bibliography) of practice in teacher education for majority language teachers; models with sample teaching materials to illustrate good practice, with guidelines for teacher educators.
In contrast, the 50-50 model includes both native speakers of a minority language and students who are monolingual in the majority language.
In footage aired in September, the woman, wearing a face-covering chador, and speaking in Azeri, the majority language in the Tabriz region of northwestern Iran from where she hails, denied that she was lashed in prison and tortured.
With the exception of one other song, discussed later, the rest of the album comprises Mapfumo's own brand of self-penned Afropop tunes sung in Shona, the majority language of his home country Zimbabwe.
The linguistic self-perception depends largely on proficiency in the official language and the frequency of interaction with speakers in the majority language group (Rannut 2005).
In certain areas, the Roma have been integrated (forcefully, in some cases), to the extent that the majority language has become their mother tongue, and Romani is generally preserved only as a lexical, not a grammatical variety.
However, this categorization may also indicate a group of patients in a non-English-speaking country who spoke the majority language (e.
Venuti intends the application of his theory towards translations from the 'minority' language to the 'majority' language--an attempt to model Venuti's theory can be seen in Table 1 Use of the disempowering/empowering classification refers to the effect the translation will have on the status of the majority language and community.
Majority language students, similarly to minority languages ones, are found to benefit largely from immersion programs by "developing the same levels of proficiency in all aspects of their native language as comparable students in programs in which the native language is the exclusive medium of instruction" (p.
When formal education is exclusively provided in the majority language, literacy in the minority language is not achieved.
To the extent that language proficiency facilitates communication with others in the workplaces, speaking the majority language can be considered as an integral component of workers' human capital.