mainliner

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mainliner

A regional street term for a person who injects an illicit substance, usually heroin, into a vein.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is a shame to find any fault with a book so brilliant, but the line between mainliners and evangelicals or Catholics feels a bit too brightly drawn for me.
I also believe that we will always need a couple of mainliners for the long hauls from Bellingham to Juneau, and from Juneau to Port Simpson in Canada.
Here we have the archetypal mainliner, doped up with hard, unrefined, unadulterated, high-octane Gerin Oil.
Twenty-one percent of retailers give reading centers a fair-to-poor rating, yet almost all report having mainliners in new stores and more than a third predict the magazines-books combination will become more prominent in future stores.
Big Tom And The Mainliners front man Tom McBride performed along with The Three Amigos, Philomena Begley and Mike Denver.
Like the mainliners, the NCRLC shifted its emphasis from evangelism to social justice during the Depression, embraced a more conservative and nationalist vision in the years after World War II, tacked left during the 1960s, and stayed there while the rest of the country shifted rightward after the election of Ronald Reagan.
Derek added: "In 1971, I wrote a spoof sketch for Halls Pictorial Weekly about a band called Mean Tom and the Highliners, an obvious send up of Big Tom and the Mainliners.
The focus during Advent, Christmas and Epiphany, at least for us Protestant mainliners, seems to be on God the Father and God the Son.
These mainliners saw themselves as more faithful to the gospel--and therefore more at odds with the dominant culture--than the conservative church, which many of them believe has been co-opted by worldly values of success, consumption, and power.
Not only have the anti-Catholic stereotypes that I earlier described disappeared or greatly weakened in most of Protestantism but also evangelicals and the conservative mainliners who once hated the papists, as they called them, now often find themselves allies with popes on issues that are for them of central Christian importance.
Bibby calls the mainliners -- the Uniteds, Anglicans, Presbyterians and Lutherans.
But mainliners generally follow the historic Presbyterian dictum of doing everything "decently and in order.