maieutics

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Related to maieutic: maieutic method

maieutics

Medspeak
An obsolete term for obstetrics, see there.
 
Philosophy
A pedagogical method which holds that every human has the capacity to understand truth, which remains latent until it is “given birth” by the Socratic method of challenging questions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cicero avoids endorsing altruism for a maieutic purpose.
She goes on to explain that, "derived from the Greek word for midwife [maia], the maieutic can be seen as a force which .
Turnbull notes that one of the random words, MAIEUTIC ("of or having to do with a method of helping to bring out ideas latent in the mind") "expressed one of the things I had hoped to achieve.
Suffering, forsaking God, Lutheran Christology, guilt and innocent suffering, intense communication in the discourses, and the maieutic relations between Upbuilding Discourses in Various Spirits and Works of Love.
Despite his apparently detached stance, the artist acts in maieutic fashion, "drawing out" rebellion against the system through play; just as in Metaphysical Painting or Surrealism, when the object becomes paradoxical, one finally sees it for what it is.
The art of conversation, so much a part of learning from the Socratic maieutic to Gadamer's advocacy of dialogue in the second generation of the Frankfurt School, is the form of the interaction between Sollers and Portzamparc The intersections of these conversations are clearly anchors in the discussion.
Notice that what is entirely missing from Protagoras' words on the teaching of virtue is all reference to the student's active involvement in learning, that is, all reference to a self and to the good or end that the self values and is interested in acquiring (all maieutic, one could say).
14] In the Platonic dialogues, Socrates frequently insists on his own maieutic mission, his duty to serve as a midwife drawing out his interlocutor's thoughts.
Along these lines, just as Hankins has argued that at times Ficino is closer to a follower of the pedagogically maieutic Socrates rather than of Plato alone,(5) one might suggest that Ficino also saw himself in a vatic way, as a follower of Pythagoras, that is, as a "wise man" (within a broad context of doctrinal orthodoxy- usually).
All of Schmidtz' examples of maieutic ends seem to have this in common: They are ends that give a person something worth living for, and to which, one can imagine being devoted.
However, the crucial issue of the "control of meaning" of these categories, both special and general, is found in the "foundational maieutic of authenticity," not in either the tradition or the social sciences.
It is my conviction that out of this meeting in depth - which I call the maieutic method - something new, a tertium quid, will be born, a new synthesis of partial religious experiences or a synthesis of all the riches God has given humankind.