magnesia

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magnesia

 [mag-ne´zhah]

mag·ne·si·um ox·ide

an antacid and laxative.

magnesia

(mag-ne'sh-a, 'zha) [L. magnesia, fr Gr. magnesia (lithos), the (stone) from Magnesia, a region of ancient Thessaly]
MgO, magnesium oxide.

calcined magnesia

Magnesium oxide.

light magnesia

Magnesium oxide.

magnesia

magnesium oxide; aperient and antacid.
References in periodicals archive ?
3+], the remaining Pmp just before its ultimate breakdown (reaction 2) will be at its most magnesian and aluminous.
His early-morning picture of the magnesian limestone stack on Seaham beach in County came top in a photography competition run by the Limestone Landscapes Project.
Another example of microstructural control is that aragonite with complex microstructures can dissolve more rapidly than thermodynamically less stable magnesian calcite (Walter, 1985).
Preliminary mineralogical examination indicates the carbonatite has an unusual and very high content of opaque oxide minerals and magnesian talc.
The magnesian limestone belt along the County Durham coast is the stronghold of the northern brown argus, which depends on the com mon rock rose which grows on the limestone soil.
A fascinating two hour stroll around the ancient magnesian limestone gorge that is Castle Eden Dene National Nature Reserve awaits, as you learn the story hidden within the stones.
Chlorite with approximately equal amounts of ferroan and magnesian components has replaced most of the garnet.
Gold mineralization is hosted in the lower Paleozoic Wolsey shale which is altered to a magnesian skarn that localizes mineralized structures.
Other North East sited which made the shortlists were: In the Human Habitation cat-|egory, Hadrian's Wall in Northumberland where it sits on top of the Whin Sill ridge in Northumberland The magnesian limestone |cliffs of South Shields and Marsden in the Historical and Scientific Importance category.
While there are lots of aquifers in the North East, those that supply most of our drinking water are the magnesian limestone between Sunderland, Hartlepool and Darlington and the fell sandstone between Kielder, Wooler, Rothbury and Berwick.
Primary Ti-rich amphiboles range from magnesio-hastingsite to magnesian hastingsitic hornblende (Leake 1978) and define a magmatic trend in which compositions become poorer in Al (total) and Ti at progressively higher values of (Fe+Mn)/(Fe+Mn+Mg).