magical thinking


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thinking

 [thingk´ing]
ideational mental activity (in contrast to emotional activity); the flow of ideas, symbols, and associations that brings forth concepts and reasons.
autistic thinking self-absorption; preoccupation with inner thoughts, daydreams, fantasies, delusions, drives, and personal logic. It is egocentric, subjective thinking lacking objectivity and preferring a narcissistic, inner, private reality to that with external validity. Used interchangeably with dereistic thinking, although differing in emphasis. Called also autism.
critical thinking a style of reasoning that involves a complex process of reflection and analysis. See accompanying table.
dereistic thinking thinking not in accordance with the facts of reality and experience and following illogical, idiosyncratic reasoning. Used interchangeably with autistic thinking, although not an exact synonym: dereistic emphasizes disconnection from reality and autistic emphasizes preoccupation with inner experience. Called also dereism.
magical thinking that characterized by the belief that thinking or wishing something can cause it to occur.
primary process thinking in psychoanalytic theory, primitive thought processes deriving from the id and marked by illogical form, preverbal content, an emphasis on immediate wish fulfillment, and an equating of thought and action. Such processes are characteristic of childhood and of dreams.
secondary process thinking in psychoanalytic theory, the more sophisticated thought processes, based on logic, obeying the rules of causality, and consistent with external reality. Such processes are characteristic of mature conscious thought.

magical thinking

irrational belief that one can bring about a circumstance or event by thinking about it or wishing for it; normal in preschool children, it also occurs in schizophrenia.

magical thinking

[maj′ikəl]
(in psychology) a belief that merely thinking about an event in the external world can cause it to occur. It is regarded as a form of regression to an early phase of development. It may be part of ideas of reference, considered normal in those instances, or may reach delusional proportions when the individual maintains a firm conviction about the belief, despite evidence to the contrary. It may be seen in schizophrenia.
The erroneous belief, similar to a normal stage of childhood development—Piaget’s pre-operational phase—that thoughts assume a magical power capable of influencing events without a physical action actually occurring; a conviction that thinking equates with doing, accompanied by an unrealistic understanding of cause and effect
Examples Dreams in children, in primitive peoples, and in patients under various conditions

magical thinking

Psychology Dereitic thinking, similar to a normal stage of childhood development, in which thoughts, words or actions assume a magical power, and are able to prevent or cause events to happen without a physical action occurring; a conviction that thinking equates with doing, accompanied by an unrealistic understanding of cause and effect Examples Dreams in children, in primitive peoples, and in Pts under various conditions

mag·ic·al think·ing

(maji-kăl thingking)
Irrational belief that one can bring about a circumstance or event by thinking about it or wishing for it; normal in preschool children, it also occurs in schizophrenia.

mag·ic·al think·ing

(maji-kăl thingking)
Irrational belief that one can bring about a circumstance or event by thinking about it or wishing for it.
References in periodicals archive ?
This article examines the parallels between financial loss due to fraud and the death of a loved one and explores, in particular, the magical thinking that has driven some of the Madoff victims' litigation.
Reflection on successes in developing fiscal sustainability would access the strategy and mechanisms developed to move beyond the magical thinking that calls for increased services with decreased funding.
The White Album" includes a long excerpt from her 1968 psychiatric report, and in The Year of Magical Thinking she recounts the flights of her mind after her husband's death, including the moment she consented to an autopsy believing it would reveal a simple problem that could be fixed, and her discomfort at throwing out her husband's shoes, believing he would need them when he returned.
The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion: An international bestseller and winner of the National Book Award in the US, Joan Didion's memoir about life after the death of her husband of 40 years is chastening, chilling and heartbreaking.
Like most people, she indulges in magical thinking; unlike most people, she allows magical thinking to determine her actions, even to shape her existence.
Because spiritual issues are not objective, how does one determine what is fantasy or unrealistic magical thinking versus a genuine, authentic spiritual experience?
In the months following its publication in October 2005, the critical reviews for loan Didion's memoir The Year of Magical Thinking, a chronicle of the death of her husband, John Gregory Dunne, and her own crushing personal grief, were overwhelmingly positive, at times to the point of near absurdity.
I don't believe in magical thinking - where one can wish away an earthquake, or the more sinister idea of wishing one up.
In the midst of this torrent of memoirs came Joan Didion's The Year of Magical Thinking.
In the absence of valid supporting data, the notion of "adaptogens" comes close to magical thinking.
From then on things become even more wild: "Tarocco and Fugue" proposes a tarot reading of Levi-Strauss utilizing music as a conceptual bridge (Schoenberg, serialism, and Court de Gebelin's chapter on the tarot in his Le Monde Primatif are analyzed in an effort to demonstrate that "it is not only modern scholars who can think in terms of structural rigor" [154]), with the concluding chapter, "De(mon)construction," presenting the culmination of the endeavor--an understanding of magical thinking as aligned with Derridean differance.
Unfortunately, this is exactly when people should care, when they should see that this sort of magical thinking by politicians and bureaucrats contributes to the problems they have living decently in Los Angeles.