macrocytosis


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Related to macrocytosis: hypochromia

macrocythemia

 [mak″ro-si-the´me-ah]
the presence of macrocytes in the blood, as in macrocytic anemia and some types of liver disease. Called also macrocytosis.

mac·ro·cy·the·mi·a

(mak'rō-sī-thē'mē-ă),
The occurrence of unusually large numbers of macrocytes in the circulating blood.
[macrocyte + G. haima, blood]

macrocytosis

/mac·ro·cy·to·sis/ (-si-to´sis) macrocythemia.

macrocytosis

(măk′rō-sī-tō′sĭs)
n. pl. macrocyto·ses (-sēz)
The presence of macrocytes in the blood.

mac′ro·cy·tot′ic (-tŏt′ĭk) adj.

macrocytosis

[mak′rōsītō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, makros + kytos + osis, condition
abnormal proliferation of macrocytes in the peripheral blood film. See also anisocytosis.

macrocytosis

The presence of abundant red cells/erythrocytes with a mean cell volume of > 100–105 fL. Macrocytosis is normal in newborns and infants but uncommon in adults, and is typical of vitamin B12 or folate deficiency.

macrocytosis

Hematology The presence of abundant RBCs with an MCV of > 105 fL and a diameter of ≥ 8.5 µm; macrocytosis is normal in newborns and infants, but uncommon in adults, and is typical of vitamin B12 or folate deficiency. See Megaloblastic anemia. Cf Microcystosis.

mac·ro·cy·the·mi·a

(mak'rō-sī-thē'mē-ă)
The occurrence of unusually large numbers of macrocytes in the circulating blood.
Synonym(s): macrocytosis, macrocythaemia.
[macrocyte + G. haima, blood]

macrocytosis

The condition in which the blood contains large numbers of enlarged red blood cells (macrocytes). This occurs when red cells are being produced more rapidly than normal to try to compensate for reduced oxygen carrying capacity.

macrocytosis

see macrocythemia.

macrocythemia, macrocytosis

the presence of macrocytes in the blood. Observed in miniature poodles without overt anemia.
References in periodicals archive ?
12] deficiency: Signs and symptoms Signs Anemia, macrocytosis (mean corpuscular volume >100 fL), hypersegmented neutrophils, idiopathic pancytopenia, elevated methylmalonic acid levels, (a) elevated homocysteine levels Symptoms Weakness, ataxia, paresthesia, memory loss, depression, hypomania, psychosis, hallucinations (a) Common in patients with renal insufficiency Source: References 2, 12
The significance of macrocytosis has been underestimated by medical professionals because about 60% of the patients present without associated anaemia [8] when there are other abnormal features to be noted.
Pernicious anemia: the expected findings of very low serum cobalamin levels anemia and macrocytosis are often lacking.
Macrocytosis with anaemia or macrocytic anaemia may be with a megaloblastic change in the bone marrow or with a non-megaloblastic change in the bone marrow.
Apart from those studies, there have only been a limited number of small studies describing macrocytosis in COPD patients.
100% of the patients corrected their initial macrocytosis and 25% their anemia; 100% of the patients had medullar regeneration with a mean increase of reticulocytes count of 32+/-11.
Diagnostic clues to megaloblastic anaemia without macrocytosis.
The erythrocyte sedimentation rate can also be high in pathologies such as anemia, macrocytosis, diabetes mellitus and hypothyroidism, and as part of physiological processes, such as gestation, menstruation and aging.
Other causes of macrocytosis include alcoholism, liver disease, and reticulocytosis.
Reticulocyte count and bone marrow evaluation, although important to rule out hemolysis and myelodysplastic changes, may not be necessary for patients with isolated macrocytosis without anemia (SOR: B, prospective cohort studies).
Folate and vitamin B12 status in relation to anaemia, macrocytosis, and cognitive impairment in older Americans in the age of folic acid fortification.