maceration


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maceration

 [mas″ĕ-ra´shun]
the softening of a solid by soaking. In histology, the softening of a tissue by soaking, especially in acids, until the connective tissue fibers are dissolved so that the tissue components can be teased apart. In obstetrics, the degenerative changes with discoloration and softening of tissues, and eventual disintegration, of a fetus retained in the uterus after its death.

mac·er·a·tion

(mas'ĕr-ā'shŭn),
1. Softening by the action of a liquid.
2. Softening of tissues after death by nonputrefactive (sterile) autolysis; seen especially in the stillborn, with detachment of the epidermis.
[L. macero, pp. -atus, to soften by soaking]

maceration

[-ā′shən]
1 the softening and breaking down of skin resulting from prolonged exposure to moisture.
2 in histology, the softening of a tissue by soaking, especially in acids, until the connective tissue fibers are dissolved so that the tissue can be teased apart.
3 in obstetrics, the degenerative changes with discoloration and softening of tissues and eventual disintegration of a fetus retained in the uterus after its death.

maceration

Obstetrics
The sloughing of immature skin from a foetus that died in vivo and was not immediately evacuated from the uterus.
 
Wound care
Necrotic tissue that has been moist for a prolonged period and undergone deterioration.

maceration

Obstetrics The sloughing of wads of immature skin from a fetus that died in vivo and wasn't immediately evacuated from the uterus Wound care Generic nastiness of a wound or ulcer which has been wet way too long

mac·er·a·tion

(mas'ěr-ā'shŭn)
1. Softening by the action of a liquid.
2. Softening of tissues after death by nonputrefactive (sterile) autolysis; seen especially in the stillborn, with bullous separation of the epidermis.
[L. macero, pp. -atus, to soften by soaking]

maceration

increase in bulk (with softening) of the stratum corneum; caused by prolonged exposure to sweat or induced by topical application of hydrolysing or caustic chemicals, in treatment of verrucae or corn

maceration (ma·s·rāˑ·shn),

n the process in which the skin is softened and broken down by extended exposure to wetness or moisture, as in a postterm infant or a dead fetus because of prolonged exposure to the amniotic fluid.

mac·er·a·tion

(mas'ěr-ā'shŭn)
Softening by the action of a liquid.
[L. macero, pp. -atus, to soften by soaking]

maceration

the softening of a solid by soaking. In histology, the softening of a tissue by soaking, especially in acids, until the connective tissue fibers are dissolved so that the tissue components can be teased apart. In obstetrics, the degenerative changes with discoloration and softening of tissues, and eventual disintegration, of a fetus retained in the uterus after its death. In herbal medicine, certain herbs may require cold water to make produce infusions or decoctions if the active ingredient is susceptible to inactivation by heat.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nevertheless pit membranes are sometimes thought to be easily broken during maceration.
It has been often reported that hot and humid weather predisposes individuals to otitis externa by causing maceration of the ear canal skin.
The gin has a delicate floral bouquet, the result of the maceration of grape flowers in the grape spirit, grown in the region of Cognac.
Furthermore, venom extraction following these handling methods has often entailed the excision and maceration of the entire venom gland, a procedure that produces impure venom (Biicherl 1953a).
To comply with our sustainable development policy, we use only green processes in all our applications and extraction technologies (water extraction, hydro-alcoholic extraction, oil maceration, floral waters and subcritical water extraction), which are all available on a custom basis.
Over the last couple of years, Bolivian CN units, as well as DEA (prior to its departure), have observed a steady increase in the use of the more efficient "Colombian" methods for cocaine production during lab seizures, including use of mechanized coca maceration and solvents, instead of acids for alkaloid extraction.
Laurent-Perrier's in its distinctive 17th century style curvaceous bottle is one of the rare roses made with the maceration technique - soaking the grapes with the skins - giving it an extraordinary richness and depth of colour.
Where other flavoured oil products rely on stewing, maceration or chemically derived additives, SpringThyme has developed a high temperature, high pressure, quick infusion method to capture the full flavour of the herbs without any adulteration.
Light Italian reds such as a fragrant Valpolicella morph into a warm, robust, full-bodied vino when the ripasso technique is used to boost the maceration of the grapes.
Common clinical conditions associated with urinary and fecal incontinence include skin maceration, erosion, or denuding of the skin and skin infections, such as candidiasis.
Arthropods are the vectors of multiple infectious disease agents and the extraction of nucleic acids from arthropods requires adequate disruption of the exoskeleton and maceration of tissues to release nucleic acids from the cells.
What seems on the surface as a nice Chilean pinot is actually a real wild child of a wine, due in no small part to up to six days' cold soak - cold soaking or cold maceration is a way to extract flavour and colour but not necessarily tannins from the grape skins and as is done chilled as this halts fermentation.