maceration


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mac·er·a·tion

(măs′ə-rā′shən)
n.
1. Softening by soaking in a liquid.
2. Softening of the tissues after death by autolysis, especially of a stillborn fetus.

maceration

[-ā′shən]
the softening and breaking down of skin resulting from prolonged exposure to moisture.

maceration

Obstetrics
The sloughing of immature skin from a foetus that died in vivo and was not immediately evacuated from the uterus.
 
Wound care
Necrotic tissue that has been moist for a prolonged period and undergone deterioration.

maceration

 [mas″ĕ-ra´shun]
the softening of a solid by soaking. In histology, the softening of a tissue by soaking, especially in acids, until the connective tissue fibers are dissolved so that the tissue components can be teased apart. In obstetrics, the degenerative changes with discoloration and softening of tissues, and eventual disintegration, of a fetus retained in the uterus after its death.

maceration (ma·s·rāˑ·shn),

n the process in which the skin is softened and broken down by extended exposure to wetness or moisture, as in a postterm infant or a dead fetus because of prolonged exposure to the amniotic fluid.

maceration

the softening of a solid by soaking. In histology, the softening of a tissue by soaking, especially in acids, until the connective tissue fibers are dissolved so that the tissue components can be teased apart. In obstetrics, the degenerative changes with discoloration and softening of tissues, and eventual disintegration, of a fetus retained in the uterus after its death. In herbal medicine, certain herbs may require cold water to make produce infusions or decoctions if the active ingredient is susceptible to inactivation by heat.

maceration

Obstetrics The sloughing of wads of immature skin from a fetus that died in vivo and wasn't immediately evacuated from the uterus Wound care Generic nastiness of a wound or ulcer which has been wet way too long

mac·er·a·tion

(mas'ĕr-ā'shŭn),
1. Softening by the action of a liquid.
2. Softening of tissues after death by nonputrefactive (sterile) autolysis; seen especially in the stillborn, with detachment of the epidermis.
[L. macero, pp. -atus, to soften by soaking]

mac·er·a·tion

(mas'ěr-ā'shŭn)
1. Softening by the action of a liquid.
2. Softening of tissues after death by nonputrefactive (sterile) autolysis; seen especially in the stillborn, with bullous separation of the epidermis.
[L. macero, pp. -atus, to soften by soaking]

mac·er·a·tion

(mas'ěr-ā'shŭn)
Softening by the action of a liquid.
[L. macero, pp. -atus, to soften by soaking]

maceration

increase in bulk (with softening) of the stratum corneum; caused by prolonged exposure to sweat or induced by topical application of hydrolysing or caustic chemicals, in treatment of verrucae or corn
References in classic literature ?
That evening when he went home, he looked at his phials to see how a process of maceration was going on, with undisturbed interest; and he wrote out his daily notes with as much precision as usual.