lysozyme


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Related to lysozyme: lysosome

lysozyme

 [li´so-zim]
a crystalline, basic protein present in saliva, tears, egg white, and many animal fluids, which functions as an antibacterial enzyme.

ly·so·zyme

(lī'sō-zīm), [MIM*153450]
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of 1,4-β linkages between N-acetylmuramic acid and N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, and is thus destructive to cell walls of certain bacteria; present in tears and some other body fluids, in egg white, and in some plant tissues; used as an antiseptic to prevent caries and treat infant formulas.

lysozyme

/ly·so·zyme/ (-zīm) an enzyme present in saliva, tears, egg white, and many animal fluids, functioning as an antibacterial agent by catalyzing the hydrolysis of specific glycosidic linkages in peptidoglycans and chitin, breaking down some bacterial cell walls.

lysozyme

(lī′sə-zīm′)
n.
An enzyme occurring naturally in egg white, human tears, saliva, and other body fluids, capable of destroying the cell walls of certain bacteria and thereby acting as a mild antiseptic.

lysozyme

[lī′səzīm]
Etymology: Gk, lysein + en, within, zyme, ferment
an enzyme with antiseptic actions that destroys some foreign organisms. It is found in granulocytic and monocytic blood cells and is normally present in saliva, sweat, breast milk, and tears.

ly·so·zyme

(lī'sō-zīm)
An enzyme destructive to cell walls of certain bacteria; present in tears, egg white, and some plant tissues; used in the prevention of caries and in the treatment of infant formulas.
Synonym(s): muramidase.

lysozyme

An enzyme found in tears, milk and other body fluids and capable of destroying certain bacteria by breaking down their walls by the digestion of their peptidoglycans.

lysozyme

an enzyme that breaks down bacterial cell walls and provides protection against bacterial invasion in the skin, mucous membranes and many body fluids. It is found especially in tears, preventing infection in the eye.

lysozyme

enzyme destructive to bacteria

lysozyme

An antibacterial enzyme present in the tears (as well as other tissues). In human tears, lysozyme makes up 21-25% of the total protein.

ly·so·zyme

(lī'sō-zīm) [MIM*153450]
An enzyme destructive to cell walls of certain bacteria; present in tears, egg white, and some plant tissues; used in caries to prevent.
Synonym(s): muramidase.

lysozyme (lī´sōzīm),

n an enzyme in major salivary secretions that may rupture bacterial cell walls and regulate the oral flora.

lysozyme

lyso—lyses bacteria; zyme—an enzyme naturally present in body fluids but ordinarily obtained from egg white for in vitro work. It hydrolyzes a specific glycoside bond in the peptidoglycan that forms bacterial cell walls, yielding the disaccharide N-acetylglucosamine-N-acetylmuramate. An important component of innate resistance.
References in periodicals archive ?
It can be easily used in the measurement of very small amounts of lysozyme.
Recently a new yak stomach lysozyme gene has been reported by Jiang et al.
When methanol was used in the mobile organic phase, the sorption of proteins such as insulin, aprotinin, cytochrome c, a-lactalbumin, ribonuclease, peroxidase, albumin, enolase, and L-glutamic dehydrogenase was affected by the sorbent, but the sorption for proteins lysozyme, myoglobin, [beta]-lactoglobulin, elastase, and carbonic anhydrase was unaffected.
3,4,13) The findings in this study are in accord with the work of others that has shown that antibodies specific for lysozyme, CD43, and CD68 are highly sensitive, although not specific.
Diagnos-Techs offers the lysozyme test (MB3) as a stand-alone test or as part of a comprehensive gastrointestinal study (GI-01 and GI-02).
Lysozyme is one of the effective protein macromolecule in the skin mucosa and gastrointestinal that plays an important role in the non-specific immune system [4,8].
The outer layer consists mainly of lysozyme, ovomycin, lectin and two other proteins--the vitelline membrane outer proteins (VMO1 and VMO2).
Research in Peru has shown that fortifying oral rehydration solution with two of the primary protective proteins in breast milk, lactoferrin and lysozyme, lessens the duration of diarrhea and reduces the rate of recurrence.
Table eggs probably do not add much during the post-farm stages, whereas "high-value" products from eggs, such as lysozyme, might contribute more".
Natural egg white lysozyme is effective against vegetative cells of Clostridium tyrobutyricum that may cause defects such as off-flavours, butyric rancidity and the phenomenon of 'late blowing' in medium, semi-hard and hard cheeses.
A sample of the extracted purified bacteriocin was assessed for its sensitivity to lysozyme and proteinase K.