lysogeny


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lysogeny

 [li-soj´e-ne]
the phenomenon in which a bacterium is infected by a temperature bacteriophage, the viral DNA is integrated in the chromosome of the host cell and replicated along with the host chromosome for many generations (the lysogenic cycle), and then production of virions and lysis of host cells (the lytic cycle) begins again. The lytic cycle is initiated spontaneously about once in 10,000 cell divisions or may be induced by ultraviolet light or chemical agents.

ly·sog·e·ny

(lī-soj'ĕ-nē),
The phenomenon by which a bacterium is infected by a temperate bacteriophage with DNA that is integrated into the bacterial genome and replicates along with the bacterial DNA but remains latent or unexpressed; triggering of the lytic cycle may occur spontaneously or by certain agents and will result in the production of bacteriophage and lysis of the bacterial cell.

lysogeny

/ly·sog·e·ny/ (li-soj´ĕ-ne) the phenomenon in which a bacterium is infected by a temperate bacteriophage, the viral DNA is integrated in the chromosome of the host cell and replicated along with the host chromosome for many generations (the lysogenic cycle), and then production of virions and lysis of host cells (the lytic cycle) begins again.

lysogeny

(lī-sŏj′ə-nē)
n.
The fusion of the nucleic acid of a bacteriophage with that of a host bacterium so that the potential exists for the newly integrated genetic material to be transmitted to daughter cells at each subsequent cell division.

ly·sog·e·ny

(lī-soj'ĕ-nē)
The phenomenon by which a bacterium is infected by a temperate bacteriophage with DNA that is integrated into the bacterial genome and replicates along with the bacterial DNA but remains latent or unexpressed; triggering of the lytic cycle may occur spontaneously or by certain agents and will result in the production of bacteriophage and lysis of the bacterial cell.

lysogeny

a state in a living bacterium when it carries a nonvirulent TEMPERATE PHAGE. In this condition the phage DNA is repressed for lytic functions (see PROPHAGE and no progeny phages are produced. The DNA may integrate into the bacterial chromosome.

lysogenicity, lysogeny

1. the ability to produce lysins or cause lysis.
2. the potentiality of a bacterium to produce bacteriophage.
3. the specific integration of the phage genome (prophage) into the bacterial genome in such a way that only a few, if any, phage genes are transcribed; the integrated phage DNA behaves much as any other bacterial gene, including being passed to each daughter cell following DNA replication and cell division.
References in periodicals archive ?
To better understand the genetics of P1, it is important to identify mutations within the c1 gene that prevent this lysogeny maintenance.
A single transformed colony of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA101 was picked from solidified Lysogeny Broth (LB) medium (10 g L[?
veronii strain isolated from the medicinal leech, was cultivated in lysogeny broth, LB, at 30 [degrees]C at 200 rpm (Sambrook and Russell, 2001); Aliquots of cells representing different phases of growth were collected and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen.
All isolates were El Tor biotype and had the El Tor type regulatory gene for phage lysogeny and the co-regulated pilus A gene identified by PCR (6,7).
Lysogeny State in which an infecting phage exists as a prophage.