lysogenic


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Related to lysogenic: Lysogenic cycle

ly·so·gen·ic

(lī'sō-jen'ik),
1. Causing or having the power to cause lysis, as the action of certain antibodies and chemical substances.
2. Pertaining to bacteria in the state of lysogeny.

lysogenic

/ly·so·gen·ic/ (li-so-jen´ik)
1. producing lysins or causing lysis.
2. pertaining to lysogeny.

lysogenic

(lī′sə-jĕn′ĭk)
adj.
1. Capable of causing or undergoing lysis.
2. Of or relating to lysogeny.

ly·so·gen·ic

(lī'sō-jen'ik)
1. Causing or having the power to cause lysis, as the action of certain antibodies and chemical substances.
2. Pertaining to bacteria in the state of lysogeny.
References in periodicals archive ?
P1 replicates as a 90 kilobase (kb) plasmid in the lysogenic state and is partitioned equally into two new daughter cells during normal cell division (2, 7, 18).
The P1 repressor protein, encoded by the c1 gene, is responsible for maintaining the P1 prophage in the lysogenic state.
The relative levels of C1 protein and Coi protein synthesis determine whether P1 will enter into lysogenic or lytic growth.
The inability of a bacteriophage to lyse a bacterial cell that already contains bacteriophage (in a lysogenic growth mode) is a condition referred to as "super infection immunity.
Phages and the evolution of bacterial pathogens: from genomic rearrangements to lysogenic conversion.
Indeed, in contrast to most other lysogenic phages, such as bacteriophage [lambda] (17), CTX[PHI] does not encode its integrase, but makes use of XerC and XerD, the two host-encoded tyrosine recombinases that normally function to resolve chromosome dimers (18).
The pathogenesis of EHEC strains is associated with production of Shiga toxins expressed from lysogenic bacteriophages in the EHEC genome.
We believe that exchange between the lysis and lysogenic conversion modules of GAS prophages has led to the swapping of virulence genes (toxins) among phages (19).
Induction of lysogenic bacteriophage and phage-associated toxin from group A streptococci during coculture with human pharyngeal cells.
Many other bacterial virulence determinants are encoded on lysogenic bacteriophage genomes (32), and the issues raised here may have public health and clinical implications beyond the understanding of STEC disease.
The genes that encode Stx1 and Stx2 are carried chromosomally or by lysogenic bacteriophages.