lysis-centrifugation

lysis-centrifugation

A technique for detecting microorganisms in a specimen of body fluid, in which the cells in the fluid are mixed in a tube, and then allowed to stand (usually for an hour) to allow its cellular components to break down. After cellular breakdown (“lysis”) the tube is centrifuged to concentrate its sediment. The sediment is subsequently spread on culture media.

Lysis-centrifugation is used to detect bacteria, fungi, mycobacteria, and other microorganisms in blood or body fluids.

References in periodicals archive ?
Lack of utility of the lysis-centrifugation blood culture method for detection of fungemia in immunocompromised cancer patients.
3) The use of automated, continuous monitoring blood culture systems for patients with suspected brucellosis should be preferred over the lysis-centrifugation method because the latter involves centrifuging clinical specimens and visually inspecting plates to detect the organism and probably increases the risk for transmission (11,27).
1) Detection of yeast fungemia by blood culture often requires 2 or 3 days of incubation, even with the use of automated continuous-monitoring blood culture systems (2) or lysis-centrifugation.
Microbiological and clinical evaluation of the isolator lysis-centrifugation blood culture tube.
Comparison of the lysis-centrifugation and agitated biphasic blood culture systems for detection of fungemia.
Comparative recovery of bacteria and yeasts from lysis-centrifugation and a conventional blood culture system.
Lysis-centrifugation blood cultures in the detection of tissue-proven invasive candidiasis: disseminated versus single-organ infection.