lysis


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lysis

 [li´sis]
1. destruction, as of cells by a specific lysin.
2. decomposition, as of a chemical compound by a specific agent. See also degradation.
3. mobilization of an organ by division of restraining adhesions.
4. the gradual abatement of the symptoms of a disease.

ly·sis

(lī'sis),
1. Destruction of red blood cells, bacteria, and other structures by a specific lysin, usually referred to by the structure destroyed (for example, hemolysis, bacteriolysis, nephrolysis); may be due to a direct toxin or an immune mechanism, such as antibody reacting with antigen on the surface of a target cell, usually by binding and activation of a series of proteins in the blood with enzymatic activity (complement system).
2. Gradual subsidence of the symptoms of an acute disease, a form of the recovery process, as distinguished from crisis.
[G. dissolution or loosening]

lysis

/ly·sis/ (li´sis)
1. destruction or decomposition, as of a cell or other substance, under influence of a specific agent.
2. mobilization of an organ by division of restraining adhesions.
3. gradual abatement of the symptoms of a disease.

lysis

(lī′sĭs)
n. pl. ly·ses (-sēz)
1. Biochemistry The dissolution or destruction of cells, such as blood cells or bacteria, as by the action of a specific lysin that disrupts the cell membrane.
2. Medicine The gradual subsiding of the symptoms of an acute disease.

lysis

[lī′sis]
Etymology: Gk, lysein, to loosen
1 destruction or dissolution of a cell or molecule through the action of a specific agent. Cell lysis is frequently caused by a lysin. lytic, adj.
2 gradual diminution in the symptoms of a disease. Compare crisis.
3 surgery performed to free adhesions of tissues. See also adhesiotomy. lyse, v.

lysis

Destruction of cells with release of contents. See Antibody-mediated lysis, Cytolysis, Follicle lysis, Hemolysis, NK-mediated lysis.

ly·sis

(lī'sis)
1. Destruction of red blood cells, bacteria, and other structures by a specific lysin, usually referred to by the structure destroyed (e.g., hemolysis, bacteriolysis, nephrolysis); may be due to a direct toxin or an immune mechanism, such as antibody reacting with antigen on the surface of a target cell, usually by binding and activation of a series of proteins in the blood with enzymatic activity (complement system).
2. Gradual subsidence of the symptoms of an acute disease; a form of the recovery process, as distinguished from crisis.
[G. dissolution or loosening]

lysis

The destruction of a living cell by disruption of its membrane. Haemolysis is lysis of red blood cells. This will occur if the cells are placed in plain water.

lysis

the rupturing of a cell with release of its contents; for example, the bursting of a bacterial cell to release BACTERIOPHAGES, or HAEMOLYSIS - the bursting of a red blood cell (see RHESUS HAEMOLYTIC ANAEMIA).

lysis

enzyme-dependent destruction (liquefaction) of cells or tissues

ly·sis

(lī'sis)
1. Destruction of red blood cells, bacteria, and other structures by a specific lysin, usually referred to by structure destroyed (e.g., hemolysis, bacteriolysis, nephrolysis).
2. Gradual subsidence of symptoms of an acute disease, a form of recovery.
[G. dissolution or loosening]

lysis (lī´sis),

n the gradual abatement of the symptoms of a disease. The disintegration or dissolution of cells by a lysin.

lysis

1. destruction or decomposition, as of a cell or other substance, under the influence of a specific agent.
2. mobilization of an organ by division of restraining adhesions.
3. gradual abatement of the clinical signs of a disease, e.g. lysis of a fever.
References in periodicals archive ?
While we also use (and encourage others to use, methods such as ligation of the distal ureteral stump, ligation of the urethra during surgery), the use of lavage is a simple measure that can aid in the lysis of cells that might escape the surgical specimen.
congestive status heart, epilepticus, failure, intractable hypotension, epilepsy) syncope, shock) Grade V + Death Death Death ULN: Upper limit of normal; LTLS: laboratory tumor lysis syndrome
Statistical analysis: Spearman correlation test was used for the correlation between the data obtained by MBL ELISA and lysis assay developed.
Endoscopic lysis of anterior glottic webs and silicone keel placement.
Tumor lysis syndrome occurs in malignancies that are highly proliferative and have high tumor burdens, such as lymphomas and leukemias.
There was no evidence of adjacent organelle lysis or of agglomeration of particulates (Figure 4).
With the development of our novel lysis buffer coupled with an excellent silica-binding chemistry, we reduced prep time to around five minutes while still delivering enough DNA for around 15 sequencing reactions.
Somewhat adjusted to the temporal dynamics of Eniaios, marveling at the nuances of pulsation within the first cycle--the fragments from Lysis seemed longer than those of the previous night and the shots derived from Charmides seemed to me much longer still, although very quick by conventional standards--I found myself wondering if it were indeed possible that the nineteen-year-old Markopoulos had had a profound understanding of Plato's texts.
To find out what Gadamer means by "entering into a conversation" with a text, let us take the Lysis, an important dialogue for Gadamer, as a guide.
In her most interesting ana lysis, she shows that Chaucer extends the metaphor of a contract beyond that of the relationship between husband and wife to that of participants in extralegal affective relationships.