lysis


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lysis

 [li´sis]
1. destruction, as of cells by a specific lysin.
2. decomposition, as of a chemical compound by a specific agent. See also degradation.
3. mobilization of an organ by division of restraining adhesions.
4. the gradual abatement of the symptoms of a disease.

ly·sis

(lī'sis),
1. Destruction of red blood cells, bacteria, and other structures by a specific lysin, usually referred to by the structure destroyed (for example, hemolysis, bacteriolysis, nephrolysis); may be due to a direct toxin or an immune mechanism, such as antibody reacting with antigen on the surface of a target cell, usually by binding and activation of a series of proteins in the blood with enzymatic activity (complement system).
2. Gradual subsidence of the symptoms of an acute disease, a form of the recovery process, as distinguished from crisis.
[G. dissolution or loosening]

lysis

/ly·sis/ (li´sis)
1. destruction or decomposition, as of a cell or other substance, under influence of a specific agent.
2. mobilization of an organ by division of restraining adhesions.
3. gradual abatement of the symptoms of a disease.

lysis

(lī′sĭs)
n. pl. ly·ses (-sēz)
1. Biochemistry The dissolution or destruction of cells, such as blood cells or bacteria, as by the action of a specific lysin that disrupts the cell membrane.
2. Medicine The gradual subsiding of the symptoms of an acute disease.

lysis

[lī′sis]
Etymology: Gk, lysein, to loosen
1 destruction or dissolution of a cell or molecule through the action of a specific agent. Cell lysis is frequently caused by a lysin. lytic, adj.
2 gradual diminution in the symptoms of a disease. Compare crisis.
3 surgery performed to free adhesions of tissues. See also adhesiotomy. lyse, v.

lysis

Destruction of cells with release of contents. See Antibody-mediated lysis, Cytolysis, Follicle lysis, Hemolysis, NK-mediated lysis.

ly·sis

(lī'sis)
1. Destruction of red blood cells, bacteria, and other structures by a specific lysin, usually referred to by the structure destroyed (e.g., hemolysis, bacteriolysis, nephrolysis); may be due to a direct toxin or an immune mechanism, such as antibody reacting with antigen on the surface of a target cell, usually by binding and activation of a series of proteins in the blood with enzymatic activity (complement system).
2. Gradual subsidence of the symptoms of an acute disease; a form of the recovery process, as distinguished from crisis.
[G. dissolution or loosening]

lysis

The destruction of a living cell by disruption of its membrane. Haemolysis is lysis of red blood cells. This will occur if the cells are placed in plain water.

lysis

the rupturing of a cell with release of its contents; for example, the bursting of a bacterial cell to release BACTERIOPHAGES, or HAEMOLYSIS - the bursting of a red blood cell (see RHESUS HAEMOLYTIC ANAEMIA).

lysis

enzyme-dependent destruction (liquefaction) of cells or tissues

ly·sis

(lī'sis)
1. Destruction of red blood cells, bacteria, and other structures by a specific lysin, usually referred to by structure destroyed (e.g., hemolysis, bacteriolysis, nephrolysis).
2. Gradual subsidence of symptoms of an acute disease, a form of recovery.
[G. dissolution or loosening]

lysis (lī´sis),

n the gradual abatement of the symptoms of a disease. The disintegration or dissolution of cells by a lysin.

lysis

1. destruction or decomposition, as of a cell or other substance, under the influence of a specific agent.
2. mobilization of an organ by division of restraining adhesions.
3. gradual abatement of the clinical signs of a disease, e.g. lysis of a fever.
References in periodicals archive ?
Epidural lysis can cause complications, including dural perforation, breaking of the catheter, spinal cord compression, and infections.
Moreover, we reached significant lysis in 376 patients who underwent CDT with a low dosage of urokinase, with rest exhibiting Grade I lysis.
In the first step, simultaneous paraffin melting and FFPE tissue lysis is performed, which is followed by DNA purification using cellulose-coated magnetic beads; this particular technology is characterized by high binding capacity and high purity of the nucleic acids obtained.
Usually this needs to happen immediately, in the lysis reaction, because NA degradation can be very rapid.
The effect of temperature and pH on the lysis activity of T4 bacteriophage (109 pfu/ml) against E.
The lysis and purification protocol has been validated for the company's PurePro-teome Nickel Magnetic Beads, optimized for the capture of histidine-tagged proteins, and its BugBuster Master Mix, a lysis reagent that allows for non-mechanical extraction of soluble protein from bacterial cells.
This was accomplished with an appropriate combination of enzyme to digest the cell wall and detergents to disrupt membranes The sedimented cells were resuspended in 200ul of lysis buffer (2% triton X-100, 150 mM Tris-Cl, 3mM MgCl2, 40 mM (NH4)2 SO4) and 12ul of proteinase K (5ug/ml).
Tumor lysis syndrome is a clinical situation which occurs with the lysis of malignant cells and causes metabolic abnormalities that threatens life.
The workflow then proceeds with a rapid "on-chip" cell lysis without RNA purification, reverse transcription, and preamplification without hands-on reagent mixing and sample transfer.