lynching


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lynching

An act of violence inflicted by a mob upon the body of a person, which results in that person’s death.

The popular definition of lynching is that of an extrajudicial execution by hanging carried out by a mob, which is functioning independently of local police and law enforcement authorities.
References in periodicals archive ?
But the overall gem in this grim collection of racial vigilantism is A Spectacular Secret: Lynching in American Life and Literature (University of Chicago Press, September 2006) by Jacqueline Goldsby.
Admittedly, many "New Negro" artists addressed the brutality and violence of lynching in their poetry, fiction, music, and drama.
13) In 1936 Johnson sent to Walter White, Executive Secretary of the NAACP, several of her lynching plays for possible production by the organization's Youth Council.
They could not argue that the lynching of a purported white man was a total aberration, since the South did have a long history of lynching whites.
But his lynching was also far more complicated, for it did have much to do with race, or the work race as an ideology could do in the era of Jim Crow.
In an era when the South was mourning the loss of its honor, ex-slaves made easy targets for retribution--and even easier ones once Reconstruction ended and the real epoch of lynching began.
Dray notes that on many levels, lynching begins to look like little more than ritualistic human sacrifice, or vicarious cannibalism.
But less than one quarter of lynching victims were even accused of attacking white women.
There were disturbing echoes of the age of lynching in June 1998, when three avowed racists chained James Byrd Jr.
Previous scholarly studies focusing on the representation of lynching in texts and images have not included an examination of lynching drama.
The first known reference to lynching in American drama occurred in 1858 in William Wells Brown's The Escape; Or, A Leap For Freedom, but lynching drama began to appear as a unique type of drama in the early twentieth century when playwrights moved beyond brief references to lynching and began to create representations of specific lynching incidents.
In her letter to White, Johnson mentioned that her lynching plays were under consideration for publication by Samuel French, but since her more recent "Catalogue of Writings" does not list these dramas among her published plays, it seems clear that French rejected them.