lynching


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lynching

An act of violence inflicted by a mob upon the body of a person, which results in that person’s death.

The popular definition of lynching is that of an extrajudicial execution by hanging carried out by a mob, which is functioning independently of local police and law enforcement authorities.
References in periodicals archive ?
The lessons about race, trust, violence and community will live on, even as the names of the participants and the details of the lynchings fade from memory.
If anything supports this idea of retaliation, it is Ken Gonzales- Day's Lynching in the West, 1850-1935 (Duke University Press, November 2006), which includes articles, photos, court records and souvenir postcards of those years of carnage, highlighting 350 hangings of blacks, Native Americans, Asians or anybody with a brown face who was handy.
Carrigan explodes the nature of the white mob as well as the elements and practices of the legitimate lynching with his book The Making of a Lynching Culture: Violence and Vigilantism in Central Texas, 1836-1916 (University of Illinois Press, August 2006).
Writing in a crisp, clear style and demonstrating an impressive mastery of a wide range of primary and secondary sources, Carrigan raises several important questions about the evolution of the lynching culture in the South.
The main quality of the present study restes on the author's ability to examine not only how the lynching phenomenon represented a cultural response in times of crisis but also how the role of the lynch mob fluctuated from one set of polarities to any other.
Georgia Douglas Johnson, The Lynching Drama Tradition, and The Anti-Lynching Movement
Thousands came, for example, to be spectators at Sam Hose's lynching in Newman, Georgia in 1899--many in specially-chartered trains.
As a narrative, the book draws its power from the sheer barbarity of lynching.
Lynching was part of a prevalent attitude of racial discrimination.
It is equally painful, however, to read representations of American lynching across the twentieth century.
Although the brutal public ritual which these plays address for the most part no longer occurs, the history of lynching, as well as the cultural legacy of lynching drama, continues to shape our understanding of race in America.
This note describes the conditions surrounding the production of "And Yet They Paused" and "A Bill to be Passed," provides brief synopses of the plays, and locates the texts in relation to Johnson's more familiar and accessible lynching dramas: Sunday Morning in the South, Safe, and Blue-Eyed Black Boy.