lymph


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Related to lymph: lymphoma, Lymph cancer

lymph

 [limf]
a transparent, usually slightly yellow, often opalescent liquid found within the lymphatic vessels, and collected from tissues in all parts of the body and returned to the blood via the lymphatic system. It is about 95 per cent water; the remainder consists of plasma proteins and other chemical substances contained in the blood plasma, but in slightly smaller percentage than in plasma. Its cellular component consists chiefly of lymphocytes.

The body contains three main kinds of fluid: blood, tissue fluid, and lymph. The blood consists of the blood cells and platelets, the plasma, or fluid portion, and a variety of chemical substances dissolved in the plasma. When the plasma, without its solid particles and some of its dissolved substances, seeps through the capillary walls and circulates among the body tissues, it is known as tissue fluid. When this fluid is drained from the tissues and collected by the lymphatic system, it is called lymph. The lymphatic system eventually returns the lymph to the blood, where it again becomes plasma. This movement of fluid through the body is described under circulatory system.
lymph node any of the accumulations of lymphoid tissue organized as definite lymphoid organs along the course of lymphatic vessels (see accompanying illustration); they consist of an outer cortical and an inner medullary part. Lymph nodes are the main source of lymphocytes of the peripheral blood and, as part of the reticuloendothelial system, serve as a defense mechanism by removing noxious agents such as bacteria and toxins, and probably play a role in antibody formation. Sometimes called, incorrectly, lymph gland. Called also lymph or lymphatic follicle and lymphatic nodule.
Location of clusters of superficial lymph nodes. From Applegate, 2000.

lymph

(limf), [TA]
A clear, transparent, sometimes faintly yellow and slightly opalescent fluid that is collected from the tissues throughout the body, flows in the lymphatic vessels (through the lymph nodes), and is eventually added to the venous blood circulation. Lymph consists of a clear liquid portion, varying numbers of white blood cells (chiefly lymphocytes), and a few red blood cells.
Synonym(s): lympha [TA]
[L. lympha, clear spring water]

lymph

(limf) a transparent, usually slightly yellow, often opalescent liquid found within the lymphatic vessels, and collected from tissues in all parts of the body and returned to the blood via the lymphatic system. Its cellular component consists chiefly of lymphocytes.
aplastic lymph , corpuscular lymph lymph that contains an excess of leukocytes and does not tend to become organized.
euplastic lymph , fibrinous lymph that which tends to coagulate and become organized.
inflammatory lymph  lymph produced by inflammation, as in wounds.
tissue lymph  lymph derived from body tissues and not from the blood.

lymph

(lĭmf)
n.
1. A clear, watery, sometimes faintly yellowish fluid derived from body tissues that contains white blood cells and circulates throughout the lymphatic system, returning to the venous bloodstream through the thoracic duct. Lymph acts to remove bacteria and certain proteins from the tissues, transport fat from the small intestine, and supply mature lymphocytes to the blood.
2. Archaic A spring or stream of pure, clear water.

lymph

[limf]
Etymology: L, lympha, water
a thin watery fluid originating in organs and tissues of the body that circulates through the lymphatic vessels and is filtered by the lymph nodes. Lymph enters the bloodstream at the junction of the internal jugular and subclavian veins. Lymph contains chyle, erythrocytes, and leukocytes, most of which are lymphocytes. See also chyle, lymphatic system, lymphatic vessels. lymphatic, adj.

lymph

(limf) [TA]
A clear, sometimes faintly yellow and slightly opalescent fluid that is collected from the tissues throughout the body, flows in the lymphatic vessels, and through the lymph nodes, and is eventually added to the venous blood circulation. Lymph consists of a clear liquid portion, varying numbers of white blood cells (chiefly lymphocytes), and a few red blood cells.

lymph

Tissue fluids drained by the lymph vessels and returned to the large veins. Lymph varies in character in different parts of the body. Lymph from the tissues contains large numbers of white cells, mainly LYMPHOCYTES, and is usually clear. Lymph from the intestines is milky, especially after a meal, because of the large number of fat globules which it contains. Fat-laden lymph is called CHYLE.

lymph

the INTERSTITIAL FLUID found in the LYMPHATIC SYSTEM and around the tissues of vertebrates, with a total volume of around 20 litres in an adult human. Although its composition varies with location in the body, lymph is typically a clear, transparent fluid (95% water) which, like blood, will clot when removed from lymph vessels since it contains similar clotting agents to blood (except platelets). Lymph also contains protein, glucose and salts with large numbers of LEUCOCYTES, mainly LYMPHOCYTES.

Lymph

The almost colourless fluid that bathes body tissues and is found in the lymphatic vessels that drain the tissues of the fluid that filters across the blood vessel walls from blood. Lymph carries antibodies and lymphocytes (white blood cells that help fight infection) that have entered the lymph nodes from the blood.

lymph

clear yellowish fluid (carrying lymphocytes, other leukocytes and some erythrocytes) that accumulates in tissues secondary to capillary blood flow; drains into lymphatic system (lymphatic capillaries, vessels and glands) and empties into the venous circulation via the thoracic duct; production and flow of lymph is increased in inflammation and infection

lymph (limf),

n colorless fluid that is carried by the lymphatic system and that contains leukocytes and cytokines that help fight disease and infection.

lymph

(limf) [TA]
A clear, sometimes faintly yellow, and slightly opalescent fluid collected from tissues throughout the body, flows in the lymphatic vessels, and through the lymph nodes, and is eventually added to the venous blood circulation.

lymph

(limf),
n a thin opalescent fluid originating in organs and tissues of the body that circulates through the lymphatic vessels and is filtered by the lymph nodes.
lymph node,
n one of the many small oval structures that filter the lymph and fight infection, and in which are formed lymphocytes, monocytes, and plasma cells. See also each of the individual lymph nodes of the head and neck as they are listed.
lymph nodes, accessory,
n the deep cervical lymph nodes situated near the accessory nerve.
lymph nodes, anterior jugular,
n a type of superficial cervical lymph node located along the anterior jugular vein.
lymph nodes, auricular
(ôrik´yələr),
n the superficial lymph nodes located surrounding the ear.

lymph

a transparent, usually slightly yellow, often opalescent liquid found within the lymphatic vessels, and collected from tissues in most parts of the body and returned to the blood via the lymphatic system. It is about 95% water; the remainder consists of plasma proteins and other chemical substances contained in the blood plasma, but in a slightly smaller percentage than in plasma. Its cellular component consists chiefly of lymphocytes.

lymph duct
large vessels carrying lymph from smaller collecting vessels. Include thoracic duct, right lymphatic duct.
lymph heart
a muscular dilatation in a lymph vessel, capable of contraction and moving lymph along the vessel. Seen in embryos and lower vertebrates.
lymph node
any of the accumulations of lymphoid tissue organized as definite lymphoid organs along the course of lymphatic vessels, consisting of an outer cortical and an inner medullary part; they are the main source of lymphocytes of the peripheral blood and, as part of the reticuloendothelial system, serve as a defense mechanism by removing noxious agents, e.g. bacteria and toxins, and play a critical role in antibody formation. Sometimes called, incorrectly, lymph glands.
lymph node abscess
hard, usually cold swellings containing pus; secondary to primary lesion in node's drainage area; a feature of some chronic infections, e.g. tuberculosis, caseous lymphadenitis of sheep; specific nodes may cause specific syndromes, e.g. retropharyngeal nodes.
lymph node hyperplasia
increase in size due to increase in number of normal cells but with preservation of natal architecture.
lymph node hypoplasia
occurs in cattle and causes antenatal edema of the fetus, leading to dystocia in many cases. The calves are not viable.
lymph nodule
germinal centers in lymph nodes which produce lymphocytes. Called also lymphatic or lymphoid nodule.
periarteriolar lymph sheath (PALS)
the white pulp, heavily populated with T lymphocytes, that surrounds arteries in the spleen.
lymph tissue
see lymphoid tissue.

Patient discussion about lymph

Q. tender protuding lymph node lump rt. arm pit aprox. 1/2" dia. any concerns or recommend treatment necessary?

A. lymph nodes can flare up any time you get infected in the armpit and all the area that it drains. i had it several times and it went away in the same manner that it came. i think that sometimes it caused because of a blockade done by deodorant. so i try to use this Chinese salt stone that doesn't contain aluminum.

More discussions about lymph
References in periodicals archive ?
Determination criteria: According to the clinical evaluation criteria for neck lymph nodes proposed by Kouvaraki et al.
The objective of our study was to compare the accuracy of FNAC in the diagnosis of neoplastic lymph node disease with that of non-neoplastic diseases.
Clinical and dissected lymph node information of patients underwent surgical treatment from January 2010 to December 2015 at our institution was collected.
KEY WORDS: Haematoxylin and eosin; acid fast bacilli; Kinyoun; Ziehl Neelsen; Lymph node.
Proponents of lymphadenectomy cite the need for accurate staging to guide adjuvant therapies, to provide prognostic information, and to eradicate metastatic lymph nodes with possible therapeutic benefit.
Some previous studies have found an increase in sentinel lymph node positivity associated with regression, while other studies suggested that regression was in fact a protective factor against sentinel lymph node metastasis.
A standardized and reproducible method for processing lymph nodes is necessary to compare the results between centres and should be a prerequisite to any use of lymph node counts as a measure of the quality of PLND.
Seventeen out of 40 necropsied goats showed slightly or moderately enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes, while no obvious lesions were observed in MLN of other goats.
Conclusion: In clinically node negative neck, the risk of lymph node metastases is significantly high in patients of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in our population.
Conclusions: Ultrasound and color Doppler findings of roundness index, absence of hilum, vascular pattern, and impedance values revealed good PPV, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy reaching 90% in differentiating benign from malignant lymph nodes.
At present, integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT) is recognised as being superior to PET alone, CT alone, or visual comparison of PET and CT images for the assessment of mediastinal lymph node involvement in NSCLC, [6] with an average sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of 73%, 80%, 78% and 91%, respectively.