lycopene


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Related to lycopene: lutein

ly·co·pene

(lī'kō-pēn),
Ψ,Ψ-Carotene; the characteristic red pigment of the tomato that may be considered chemically as the parent substance from which all natural carotenoid pigments are derived; an unsaturated hydrocarbon made up of eight isoprene units, two of them hydrogenated, with 11 conjugated double bonds.

lycopene

/ly·co·pene/ (li´ko-pēn) the red carotenoid pigment of tomatoes and various berries and fruits.

lycopene

(lī′kə-pēn′)
n.
A red carotenoid pigment, C40H56, found in plants such as tomatoes, watermelons, and papayas, and present in the blood and certain tissues of animals. It is used as a food coloring.

lycopene

[lī′kəpēn]
Etymology: Gk, lykopersikon, tomato
a red crystalline unsaturated hydrocarbon that is the carotenoid pigment in tomatoes and various berries and fruits. It is considered the primary substance from which all natural carotenoid pigments are derived. Numerous studies correlate high intake of lycopene-containing foods with reduced incidence of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and macular degeneration.

lycopene

A carotenoid that is abundant in tomatoes, watermelon, pink grapefruit and red peppers, and is a potent antioxidant. Lycopene consumption is linked to a reduced risk of pancreatic, prostate, bladder, colon and cervical cancers and cancer cell growth in vitro; some data suggest that lycopene may be the most cardioprotective carotenoid.

ly·co·pene

(lī'kō-pēn)
The red pigment of the tomato; the parent substance from which all natural carotenoid pigments are derived.

lycopene

A carotenoid antioxidant pigment occurring in ripe fruit especially tomatoes. The colour of tomatoes is due to lycopene. Organic tomato ketchup is a fruitful source. The substance has been shown to be protective against breast, pancreatic, prostatic and colonic cancer.

lycopene (līˑ·kō·pēn),

n a carotenoid pigment and an antioxidant that is present in tomatoes (concentrated in processed products like tomato paste and sauce), guavas, watermelons, and grapefruit. May have preventive effects against prostate, lung, colon, and breast cancer; also reduce the risks of cataracts and macular degeneration.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Chris Hiley, head of policy and research for the Prostate Cancer Charity, said the effect of lycopene on prostate cancer had been subject to scientific studies, but added: "We still can't come to a firm conclusion that the risk of prostate cancer is reduced by increasing lycopene intake, but it is very clear that men should eat a varied and healthy diet, and tomato and tomato-based products have a place in that.
The resulting lycopene can be processed into a powder, paste or liquid suitable for use as a nutritional supplement or food coloring.
A more recent study suggests protection doesn't come from lycopene alone, but from a mixture of carotenoids occurring naturally in tomatoes.
Tomatoes are high in content of a substance called lycopene which is found in many red fruits and vegetables.
Thus the aim of this pilot study was to investigate if lycopene inhibits disease progression in BPH, and improves clinical markers and symptoms of BPH.
Lycopene, the antioxidant that gives tomatoes their red colour, was already known to help fight cancer as well as heart disease and diabetes.
Eleanor Barrie, of Cancer Research UK, said: "This small study doesn't directly tell us if lycopene has any effect against cancer.
Cooked tomatoes provide even more lycopene than do raw ones because heat loosens lycopene's bonds to tomato-cell walls and helps your body use the pigment.
Only recently, studies have revealed that lycopene may have twice the punch of another well-known antioxidant, betacarotene.
Dr Mridula Chopra and colleagues at the University of Portsmouth tested the effect of the nutrient lycopene on the simple mechanism through which cancer cells hijack a body's healthy blood supply to grow and spread.
Experts at the University of Portsmouth tested the effect of the nutrient lycopene on the simple mechanism through which cancer cells hijack a body's healthy blood supply to grow and spread.
As scientists study the relationship between diet and osteoporosis, they're learning that the antioxidant lycopene may help us reduce risk and improve our new old age.