luxation


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Related to luxation: Lens luxation

dislocation

 [dis″lo-ka´shun]
displacement of a bone from a joint; called also luxation. The most common ones involve a finger, thumb, shoulder, or hip; less common are those of the mandible, elbow, or knee. Symptoms include loss of motion, temporary paralysis of the joint, pain, swelling, and sometimes shock. Dislocations are usually caused by a blow or fall, although unusual physical effort may also cause one. A few dislocations, especially of the hip, are congenital, usually from a faulty construction of the joint, and are best treated in infancy with a cast and possibly surgery.

A dislocation should be treated as a fracture when first aid is administered. First aid includes checking for a pulse distal to the location and keeping the patient as still as possible. The patient is moved as a whole unit on a long board or a stretcher. As soon as possible the dislocation must be reduced by a surgeon.
Shoulder dislocation.
complete dislocation one in which the surfaces are entirely separated.
compound dislocation one in which the joint communicates with the outside air through a wound.
congenital dislocation of the hip a former name for developmental dysplasia of the hip.
pathologic dislocation one due to disease of the joint or to paralysis of the muscles.
simple dislocation one in which there is no communication with the air through a wound.

lux·a·tion

(lŭk-sā'shŭn),
1. Synonym(s): dislocation
2. In dentistry, the dislocation or displacement of the condyle in the temporomandibular fossa, or of a tooth from the alveolus.
[L. luxatio]

luxation

/lux·a·tion/ (luk-sa´shun) dislocation.

luxation

[luksā′shən]
Etymology: L, luxare, to dislocate
dislocation.

luxation

Orthopedics The complete dislocation of a joint. Cf Atlantoaxial subluxation, Subluxation.

lux·a·tion

(lŭk-sā'shŭn)
1. Synonym(s): dislocations.
2. dentistry The dislocation or displacement of the condyle in the temporomandibular fossa, or of a tooth from the alveolus.
[L. luxatio]

luxation

Dislocation.

dislocation

; luxation loss of normal bone alignment at a joint, e.g. due to trauma, or congenital ligamentous laxity

lux·a·tion

(lŭk-sā'shŭn)
1. In dentistry, dislocation or displacement of condyle in temporomandibular fossa, or of a tooth from the alveolus.
2. Synonym(s): dislocation.
[L. luxatio]

luxation

(luk´sā´shən),
n 1. the act of luxating or state of being luxated, as in the dislocation or displacement of a tooth or of the temporomandibular joint.
2. the dislocation or displacement of a tooth or of the temporomandibular articulation.

luxation

References in periodicals archive ?
Etiology of luxation in this patient was related to a fall and excessive limb abduction and; therefore, differs from the data obtained from small animals with craniodorsal hip luxation, in which motor vehicle accidents were the major cause (MCCARTNEY et al.
This case report describes the non-surgical treatment with MTA and a six-year follow-up of a maxillary lateral incisor, resorbed by ectopic eruption of the canine and complicated by a lateral luxation injury.
Signal alterations dorsal of the lateral malleolus along the peroneal tendons without luxation or rupture of the tendons are apparent.
Le joueur, dont le poste demande de pousser en premiere ligne de melee et de lancer en touche, souffre "d'un hematome a la cuisse droite ainsi que d'une double luxation acromio-claviculaire des epaules droite et gauche", a precise l'encadrement du XV de France dans un communique, deux heures a peine apres avoir rejoint le Centre national du rugby (CNR) de Marcoussis (Essonne).
In a complementary investigation, it was preformed computed tomography (CT) of the cervical spine which evidenced C6-C7 luxation, without any associated bone fractures (Figure 1).
He describes anatomical considerations and classification of trauma, examination and diagnosis, treatment planning, and procedures for specific types of trauma, such as fractures, subluxation, luxation, transient apical breakdown, avulsion, and trauma to the primary dentition and supporting structures.
X-rays revealed a four-week-old injury, consisting of a fractured femoral neck, a fractured pelvis in three places and sacroiliac luxation.
Diagnosis of luxation injuries: the importance of standardized clinical, radiographic and photographic techniques in clinical investigations.
The initial treatment plan involved surgical luxation followed by orthodontic treatment.
The device was developed to combat the predominant causes of knee implant failure, luxation, wear and poor positioning associated with metal components, Aesculap's EnduRo knee revision system relies on PEEK-Optima CFR polymer to increase the implant service life and reduce the necessity of subsequent revision surgery, according to Aesculap.
Lateral luxation of the patella, of difficult reduction.
Regarding pattern, the most common type of injury was avulsion and subluxation followed by crown fractures, luxation, root fractures and tooth displacements in various directions.