lust

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lust

A poetic (i.e., non-medical) term for intense sexual desire for another person or, less commonly, an object.
References in periodicals archive ?
But ultimately, just as Jones's ill-regulated lustiness comes to draw him into ever darker appearances of criminality (seemingly sleeping with his own mother; being 'kept' by Lady Bellaston), so the combination of his natural combativeness and his complicity with the false honour of the military profession does finally entrap him (despite the noble motives with which he volunteered): having been surprised into drawing his sword to defend himself against Fitzpatrick (XIV.
Arlene Stein's Sisters; Sexperts; QueersBeyond the Lesbian Nation is a collection of essays by lesbians, half of whom came of age in the eighties, whose political consciousness has been shaped by the in your-face lustiness of AIDS activists, Queer Nation, pornographers and "sexperts?
He has inherited more of his father's lustiness than his brothers, but is saved from the old man's depravity by his own innately noble nature.
What I found was a substantial love onion; no matter how many layers of lustiness I peeled away, there was always another layer, fresh and original, just below the surface.
Clearly hard - especially physical - work is not always conducive to lustiness.
Again, we do hear of Edmund's youthful lustiness and an apparent sexual transgression, but this seems more in keeping with Florian's soldierly libertinism than suggesting some dark family sin.
Cons: The racial element and the daughter's lustiness in tonight's debut are both hackneyed and on the queasy side, indicating the series won't mind settling for easy jokes.
Productions can find Falstaff a loveable rogue, a man puffed-up with his own mistaken self-assurance, but there has been, on rare occasions, room for something darker, as in James Henry Hackett's much-admired performance in the mid-19th century, where he "interpreted a mind that was merry, but one in which merriment was strongly tinctured with scorn" (Winter 44), so that "[for] all the role's surface lustiness and jollification, Hackett intended it as an example of wickedness to be condemned" (Shattuck 59).